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The jobs with the most and least security

24/7 Wall St. logo 24/7 Wall St. 2/28/2019 Samuel Stebbins

According to a recent Gallup poll, 18% of American workers are worried about losing their job -- down from a peak of 31% in 2009 in the wake of the Great Recession. American workers have good reason to feel secure. The economy has added jobs for the last 100 consecutive months, and the unemployment rate recently hit its lowest point since the 1960s.

Still, while the jobs picture in the United States is encouraging on a broad scale, on a more granular level, certain jobs are inherently less secure than others.

24/7 Wall St. reviewed unemployment rates by occupation from the Bureau of Labor Statistics to identify the occupations with the best and worst job security. The 32 jobs with the highest job security have unemployment rates below 1.0%, while the 32 jobs with the lowest job security have unemployment rates of at least 6.6%.

Related video: The Highest Paying Jobs in America (provided by Veuer)

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The jobs with the lowest job security tend to require little education. Many of these jobs are also projected to become less common in the future as automation will reduce hiring demand.

Meanwhile, the most secure jobs typically require at least some college, and often a doctoral or professional degree. Additionally, partially because the government never goes out of business, these jobs are far more likely to be in the public sector, either at the local, state, or federal level.

Jobs With the Best Job Security

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32. Civil engineers

> Unemployment rate: 0.9% (tied - 24th lowest)

> Labor force: 460,000

> Median annual wage: $84,770

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +10.6%

> Typical entry level edu. required: Bachelor's degree

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31. Dentists

> Unemployment rate: 0.9% (tied - 24th lowest)

> Labor force: 163,000

> Median annual wage: $158,120

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +19.1%

> Typical entry level edu. required: Doctoral or professional degree

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30. Farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural managers

> Unemployment rate: 0.9% (tied - 24th lowest)

> Labor force: 1.0 million

> Median annual wage: $69,620

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: -0.8%

> Typical entry level edu. required: High school diploma or equivalent

a man and a woman standing in front of a curtain: > Women’s earnings as pct. of men’s: 68.8% > Women’s median weekly earnings: $515 > Men’s median weekly earnings: $749 > Number of workers: 190,000 (40.5% women) First-line supervisors of housekeeping and janitorial workers oversee cleaning staff in any number of facilities, including hotels, hospitals, and offices. Though women comprise 84.3% of all maids and housekeepers in the United States, they comprise just 40.5% of supervisor roles. The job also has one the largest income gaps between men and women in the country. The typical female supervisor of a janitorial or housekeeping staff earns an estimated $26,780 a year, or about 69% of the $38,948 a male in the occupation earns annually. © yacobchuk / iStock > Women’s earnings as pct. of men’s: 68.8% > Women’s median weekly earnings: $515 > Men’s median weekly earnings: $749 > Number of workers: 190,000 (40.5% women) First-line supervisors of housekeeping and janitorial workers oversee cleaning staff in any number of facilities, including hotels, hospitals, and offices. Though women comprise 84.3% of all maids and housekeepers in the United States, they comprise just 40.5% of supervisor roles. The job also has one the largest income gaps between men and women in the country. The typical female supervisor of a janitorial or housekeeping staff earns an estimated $26,780 a year, or about 69% of the $38,948 a male in the occupation earns annually.

29. First-line supervisors of housekeeping and janitorial workers

> Unemployment rate: 0.9% (tied - 24th lowest)

> Labor force: 342,000

> Median annual wage: $39,230

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +9.9%

> Typical entry level edu. required: High school diploma or equivalent

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28. First-line supervisors of personal service workers

> Unemployment rate: 0.9% (tied - 24th lowest)

> Labor force: 210,000

> Median annual wage: $37,450

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +14.6%

> Typical entry level edu. required: High school diploma or equivalent

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27. Insurance underwriters

> Unemployment rate: 0.9% (tied - 24th lowest)

> Labor force: 120,000

> Median annual wage: $69,760

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: -5.2%

> Typical entry level edu. required: Bachelor's degree

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26. Lawyers

> Unemployment rate: 0.9% (tied - 24th lowest)

> Labor force: 1.2 million

> Median annual wage: $119,250

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +8.2%

> Typical entry level edu. required: Doctoral or professional degree

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25. Medical and health services managers

> Unemployment rate: 0.9% (tied - 24th lowest)

> Labor force: 645,000

> Median annual wage: $98,350

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +20.5%

> Typical entry level edu. required: Bachelor's degree

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24. Personal financial advisors

> Unemployment rate: 0.9% (tied - 24th lowest)

> Labor force: 542,000

> Median annual wage: $90,640

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +14.9%

> Typical entry level edu. required: Bachelor's degree

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23. Directors, religious activities and education

> Unemployment rate: 0.8% (tied - 20th lowest)

> Labor force: 77,000

> Median annual wage: $38,980

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +7.1%

> Typical entry level edu. required: Bachelor's degree

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22. Financial analysts

> Unemployment rate: 0.8% (tied - 20th lowest)

> Labor force: 309,000

> Median annual wage: $84,300

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +10.9%

> Typical entry level edu. required: Bachelor's degree

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21. Reservation and transportation ticket agents and travel clerks

> Unemployment rate: 0.8% (tied - 20th lowest)

> Labor force: 129,000

> Median annual wage: $36,280

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +3.8%

> Typical entry level edu. required: High school diploma or equivalent

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20. Speech-language pathologists

> Unemployment rate: 0.8% (tied - 20th lowest)

> Labor force: 153,000

> Median annual wage: $76,610

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +17.8%

> Typical entry level edu. required: Master's degree

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19. Aircraft mechanics and service technicians

> Unemployment rate: 0.7% (tied - 16th lowest)

> Labor force: 165,000

> Median annual wage: $61,020

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +4.9%

> Typical entry level edu. required: Postsecondary nondegree award

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18. Aircraft pilots and flight engineers

> Unemployment rate: 0.7% (tied - 16th lowest)

> Labor force: 120,000

> Median annual wage: $137,330

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: N/A

> Typical entry level edu. required: N/A

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17. Budget analysts

> Unemployment rate: 0.7% (tied - 16th lowest)

> Labor force: 51,000

> Median annual wage: $75,240

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +6.5%

> Typical entry level edu. required: Bachelor's degree

> Fatal injuries in 2017: 12.9 per 100,000 workers
> Total: 95 fatal injuries
> Most common fatal accidents: Violence and other injuries by persons or animals
> Median annual wage: $61,050
Given the nature of police work, this makes sense. Officers are frequently required to work in high-risk situations, engaging in high-speed chases and confronting potentially violent individuals. The most common cause of workplace fatalities among police officers is direct violence from other people, but a close second is transportation accidents.
ALSO READ: Teams With the Most Hall of Famers © RyanJLane / Getty Images

> Fatal injuries in 2017: 12.9 per 100,000 workers
> Total: 95 fatal injuries
> Most common fatal accidents: Violence and other injuries by persons or animals
> Median annual wage: $61,050

Given the nature of police work, this makes sense. Officers are frequently required to work in high-risk situations, engaging in high-speed chases and confronting potentially violent individuals. The most common cause of workplace fatalities among police officers is direct violence from other people, but a close second is transportation accidents.

ALSO READ: Teams With the Most Hall of Famers

16. Police and sheriff's patrol officers

> Unemployment rate: 0.7% (tied - 16th lowest)

> Labor force: 733,000

> Median annual wage: $61,050

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +7.0%

> Typical entry level edu. required: High school diploma or equivalent

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15. Dental hygienists

> Unemployment rate: 0.6% (tied - 14th lowest)

> Labor force: 179,000

> Median annual wage: $74,070

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +19.7%

> Typical entry level edu. required: Associate's degree

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14. Probation officers and correctional treatment specialists

> Unemployment rate: 0.6% (tied - 14th lowest)

> Labor force: 105,000

> Median annual wage: $51,410

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +5.7%

> Typical entry level edu. required: Bachelor's degree

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13. Database administrators

> Unemployment rate: 0.5% (tied - 9th lowest)

> Labor force: 109,000

> Median annual wage: $87,020

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +11.5%

> Typical entry level edu. required: Bachelor's degree

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12. Opticians, dispensing

> Unemployment rate: 0.5% (tied - 9th lowest)

> Labor force: 61,000

> Median annual wage: $36,250

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +15.0%

> Typical entry level edu. required: High school diploma or equivalent

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11. Postal service clerks

> Unemployment rate: 0.5% (tied - 9th lowest)

> Labor force: 121,000

> Median annual wage: $58,550

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: -12.1%

> Typical entry level edu. required: High school diploma or equivalent

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10. Precision instrument and equipment repairers

> Unemployment rate: 0.5% (tied - 9th lowest)

> Labor force: 65,000

> Median annual wage: $56,940

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: N/A

> Typical entry level edu. required: N/A

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9. Psychologists

> Unemployment rate: 0.5% (tied - 9th lowest)

> Labor force: 225,000

> Median annual wage: $77,030

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +13.8%

> Typical entry level edu. required: Doctoral or professional degree

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8. Physicians and surgeons

> Unemployment rate: 0.4% (tied - 7th lowest)

> Labor force: 1.1 million

> Median annual wage: > $208,000

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +12.8%

> Typical entry level edu. required: Doctoral or professional degree

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7. Veterinarians

> Unemployment rate: 0.4% (tied - 7th lowest)

> Labor force: 102,000

> Median annual wage: $90,420

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +18.8%

> Typical entry level edu. required: Doctoral or professional degree

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6. Aerospace engineers

> Unemployment rate: 0.3% (6th lowest)

> Labor force: 147,000

> Median annual wage: $113,030

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +6.1%

> Typical entry level edu. required: Bachelor's degree

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5. Computer network architects

> Unemployment rate: 0.1% (tied - 2nd lowest)

> Labor force: 114,000

> Median annual wage: $104,650

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +6.5%

> Typical entry level edu. required: Bachelor's degree

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4. Court, municipal, and license clerks

> Unemployment rate: 0.1% (tied - 2nd lowest)

> Labor force: 83,000

> Median annual wage: $37,300

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +6.5%

> Typical entry level edu. required: High school diploma or equivalent

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3. Optometrists

> Unemployment rate: 0.1% (tied - 2nd lowest)

> Labor force: 54,000

> Median annual wage: $110,300

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +17.9%

> Typical entry level edu. required: Doctoral or professional degree

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2. Veterinary assistants and laboratory animal caretakers

> Unemployment rate: 0.1% (tied - 2nd lowest)

> Labor force: 56,000

> Median annual wage: $26,140

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +19.4%

> Typical entry level edu. required: High school diploma or equivalent

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1. Appraisers and assessors of real estate

> Unemployment rate: 0.0% (the lowest)

> Labor force: 84,000

> Median annual wage: $54,010

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +14.4%

> Typical entry level edu. required: Bachelor's degree

Jobs with the Worst Job Security

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32. Cleaners of vehicles and equipment

> Unemployment rate: 6.6% (tied - 32nd highest)

> Labor force: 352,000

> Median annual wage: $23,360

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +10.7%

> Typical entry level edu. required: No formal educational credential

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31. Cooks

> Unemployment rate: 6.6% (tied - 32nd highest)

> Labor force: 2.2 million

> Median annual wage: $23,970

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +6.1%

> Typical entry level edu. required: No formal educational credential

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30. Dining room and cafeteria attendants and bartender helpers

> Unemployment rate: 6.7% (tied - 30th highest)

> Labor force: 331,000

> Median annual wage: $21,160

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +7.1%

> Typical entry level edu. required: No formal educational credential

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29. Hotel, motel, and resort desk clerks

> Unemployment rate: 6.7% (tied - 30th highest)

> Labor force: 140,000

> Median annual wage: $22,850

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +4.4%

> Typical entry level edu. required: High school diploma or equivalent

a person wearing a hat: The latest fashions are introduced first to the nation's urban centers. Bombarded by shopping opportunities, advertisements, and seasoned city-dwellers flaunting carefully chosen clothing and accessories, the newly initiated big city resident is at considerable risk of developing a fashion sense. ALSO READ: Most Dangerous Countries for Women © SanneBerg / Getty Images The latest fashions are introduced first to the nation's urban centers. Bombarded by shopping opportunities, advertisements, and seasoned city-dwellers flaunting carefully chosen clothing and accessories, the newly initiated big city resident is at considerable risk of developing a fashion sense. ALSO READ: Most Dangerous Countries for Women

28. Models, demonstrators, and product promoters

> Unemployment rate: 6.8% (tied - 28th highest)

> Labor force: 64,000

> Median annual wage: $27,060

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: N/A

> Typical entry level edu. required: High school diploma or equivalent

> Fatal injuries in 2017: 8.9 per 100,000 workers
> Total: 44 fatal injuries, 4,200 nonfatal injuries
> Most common fatal accidents: Falls, slips, trips
> Median annual wage: $37,960
Construction and maintenance painters apply paint, stain, and other coatings to buildings and other structures. They often work in demanding or dangerous environments and can sustain injury from lifting heavy objects and exposure to chemicals and other irritants. The most common cause of fatal injury among professional painters is alls and trips while working on ladders or other elevated locations. © aydinmutlu / Getty Images

> Fatal injuries in 2017: 8.9 per 100,000 workers
> Total: 44 fatal injuries, 4,200 nonfatal injuries
> Most common fatal accidents: Falls, slips, trips
> Median annual wage: $37,960

Construction and maintenance painters apply paint, stain, and other coatings to buildings and other structures. They often work in demanding or dangerous environments and can sustain injury from lifting heavy objects and exposure to chemicals and other irritants. The most common cause of fatal injury among professional painters is alls and trips while working on ladders or other elevated locations.

27. Painters, construction and maintenance

> Unemployment rate: 6.9% (27th highest)

> Labor force: 652,000

> Median annual wage: $37,960

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +5.7%

> Typical entry level edu. required: No formal educational credential

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26. Bill and account collectors

> Unemployment rate: 7.0% (tied - 23rd highest)

> Labor force: 131,000

> Median annual wage: $35,330

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: -3.0%

> Typical entry level edu. required: High school diploma or equivalent

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25. Cement masons, concrete finishers, and terrazzo workers

> Unemployment rate: 7.0% (tied - 23rd highest)

> Labor force: 54,000

> Median annual wage: $42,900

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +12.6%

> Typical entry level edu. required: High school diploma or equivalent

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24. Mail clerks and mail machine operators, except postal service

> Unemployment rate: 7.0% (tied - 23rd highest)

> Labor force: 68,000

> Median annual wage: $29,620

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: -7.4%

> Typical entry level edu. required: High school diploma or equivalent

a person wearing a hat and sunglasses standing outside of a building: > Fatal injuries in 2017: 11.8 per 100,000 workers
> Total: 45 fatal injuries, 2,230 nonfatal injuries
> Most common fatal accidents: Transportation incidents
> Median annual wage: $47,040
Construction is a relatively dangerous industry, and those who operate construction equipment are not much safer than others on the site. There were nearly 12 deaths for every 100,000 full-time engineers and equipment operators in 2017 -- fewer than the 14 deaths per 100,000 among construction laborers -- but still among the most of any job. Nonfatal injuries are also common. According to the BLS, operating equipment like bulldozers and pile-drivers can lead to long-term injury or disability due to stress from repeated shaking and noise. © Drazen_ / Getty Images

> Fatal injuries in 2017: 11.8 per 100,000 workers
> Total: 45 fatal injuries, 2,230 nonfatal injuries
> Most common fatal accidents: Transportation incidents
> Median annual wage: $47,040

Construction is a relatively dangerous industry, and those who operate construction equipment are not much safer than others on the site. There were nearly 12 deaths for every 100,000 full-time engineers and equipment operators in 2017 -- fewer than the 14 deaths per 100,000 among construction laborers -- but still among the most of any job. Nonfatal injuries are also common. According to the BLS, operating equipment like bulldozers and pile-drivers can lead to long-term injury or disability due to stress from repeated shaking and noise.

23. Operating engineers and other construction equipment operators

> Unemployment rate: 7.0% (tied - 23rd highest)

> Labor force: 368,000

> Median annual wage: $47,040

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +12.3%

> Typical entry level edu. required: High school diploma or equivalent

a person cutting food on a tray: Almost 40% of Americans patronize a fast food restaurant at least once a day, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Maybe some people actually frequent these chains in search of a healthy meal, but research shows that most people choose such places because they’re cheap and convenient (“fast,” in a word), and because they just happen to like eating burgers and fried chicken and tacos and the rest of the items that fast food establishments offer.
Fast food menus have evolved in recent years, however. Spurred by competition from small but growing “healthy grab-and-go” chains like Sweetgreen, Dig Inn, By Chloe, and Salad and Go, major players like McDonald's, Taco Bell, and Dunkin’ Donuts are adapting.
Sometimes, new initiatives at these chains are focused on sustainability and the phasing out of artificial ingredients. Taco Bell, for instance, has pledged to start using cage-free eggs, while McDonald’s has started sourcing chicken raised without antibiotics. And just about all the major fast food chains have added, and are promoting, menu items lower in calories, fat, sodium, and sugar than their typical fare.
From Popeyes' blackened chicken tenders, made with no breading or batter, to Tim Horton’s modestly proportioned Wrap Snackers, to the fresh salads offered by almost everybody these days, it is now possible to find at least some healthy alternatives at almost every fast food outlet.
Nonetheless, a survey conducted in 2017 by brand advisory firm Deloitte found that 83% of Americans surveyed believed that traditional fast food menus (as opposed to those at the grab-and-go chains) did not offer enough healthy choices. If the companies behind the country’s most popular fast food restaurants would respond to market demand, this situation may well change.
In the meantime, it’s possible to find at least a few healthy items at virtually every fast food restaurant. Is it likely that the average customer will go to one of these and order only the low-cal, low-fat options? Probably not, but at least they’re there — apple slices instead of fries with that burger, grits instead of mac ‘n cheese with that fried chicken — to help make the overall experience a little less deleterious.
Methodology
To identify the healthiest option at every major fast food chain in the United States, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the nutritional contents of every item on their menus. To compare each item, we created an index of calories, fat, salt, and sugar. Foods with relatively few calories, sodium, sugar, and fat compared to other items offered by the same restaurant received higher scores. Only food items intended for single individual consumption were considered. Sides, garnishes, and kids’ items were excluded (unless, in the latter case, they can be ordered individually by adults wishing smaller portions). © Juanmonino / Getty Images

Almost 40% of Americans patronize a fast food restaurant at least once a day, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Maybe some people actually frequent these chains in search of a healthy meal, but research shows that most people choose such places because they’re cheap and convenient (“fast,” in a word), and because they just happen to like eating burgers and fried chicken and tacos and the rest of the items that fast food establishments offer.

Fast food menus have evolved in recent years, however. Spurred by competition from small but growing “healthy grab-and-go” chains like Sweetgreen, Dig Inn, By Chloe, and Salad and Go, major players like McDonald's, Taco Bell, and Dunkin’ Donuts are adapting.

Sometimes, new initiatives at these chains are focused on sustainability and the phasing out of artificial ingredients. Taco Bell, for instance, has pledged to start using cage-free eggs, while McDonald’s has started sourcing chicken raised without antibiotics. And just about all the major fast food chains have added, and are promoting, menu items lower in calories, fat, sodium, and sugar than their typical fare.

From Popeyes' blackened chicken tenders, made with no breading or batter, to Tim Horton’s modestly proportioned Wrap Snackers, to the fresh salads offered by almost everybody these days, it is now possible to find at least some healthy alternatives at almost every fast food outlet.

Nonetheless, a survey conducted in 2017 by brand advisory firm Deloitte found that 83% of Americans surveyed believed that traditional fast food menus (as opposed to those at the grab-and-go chains) did not offer enough healthy choices. If the companies behind the country’s most popular fast food restaurants would respond to market demand, this situation may well change.

In the meantime, it’s possible to find at least a few healthy items at virtually every fast food restaurant. Is it likely that the average customer will go to one of these and order only the low-cal, low-fat options? Probably not, but at least they’re there — apple slices instead of fries with that burger, grits instead of mac ‘n cheese with that fried chicken — to help make the overall experience a little less deleterious.

Methodology

To identify the healthiest option at every major fast food chain in the United States, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the nutritional contents of every item on their menus. To compare each item, we created an index of calories, fat, salt, and sugar. Foods with relatively few calories, sodium, sugar, and fat compared to other items offered by the same restaurant received higher scores. Only food items intended for single individual consumption were considered. Sides, garnishes, and kids’ items were excluded (unless, in the latter case, they can be ordered individually by adults wishing smaller portions).

22. Combined food preparation and serving workers, including fast food

> Unemployment rate: 7.2% (22nd highest)

> Labor force: 347,000

> Median annual wage: $20,180

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +16.8%

> Typical entry level edu. required: No formal educational credential

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21. Grounds maintenance workers

> Unemployment rate: 7.5% (21st highest)

> Labor force: 1.4 million

> Median annual wage: $28,110

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +11.2%

> Typical entry level edu. required: No formal educational credential

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20. Cashiers

> Unemployment rate: 7.6% (20th highest)

> Labor force: 3.5 million

> Median annual wage: $21,030

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: -0.9%

> Typical entry level edu. required: No formal educational credential

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19. Laborers and freight, stock, and material movers, hand

> Unemployment rate: 7.7% (tied - 17th highest)

> Labor force: 2.3 million

> Median annual wage: $27,040

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +7.6%

> Typical entry level edu. required: No formal educational credential

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18. Structural iron and steel workers

> Unemployment rate: 7.7% (tied - 17th highest)

> Labor force: 65,000

> Median annual wage: $52,610

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +12.8%

> Typical entry level edu. required: High school diploma or equivalent

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17. Word processors and typists

> Unemployment rate: 7.7% (tied - 17th highest)

> Labor force: 73,000

> Median annual wage: $39,740

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: -33.1%

> Typical entry level edu. required: High school diploma or equivalent

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16. Tax preparers

> Unemployment rate: 7.8% (16th highest)

> Labor force: 123,000

> Median annual wage: $38,730

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +10.8%

> Typical entry level edu. required: High school diploma or equivalent

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15. Lifeguards and other recreational, and all other protective service workers

> Unemployment rate: 8.0% (tied - 13th highest)

> Labor force: 127,000

> Median annual wage: $21,290

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: N/A

> Typical entry level edu. required: No formal educational credential

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14. Miscellaneous entertainment attendants and related workers

> Unemployment rate: 8.0% (tied - 13th highest)

> Labor force: 228,000

> Median annual wage: $24,200

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: N/A

> Typical entry level edu. required: N/A

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13. Packaging and filling machine operators and tenders

> Unemployment rate: 8.0% (tied - 13th highest)

> Labor force: 301,000

> Median annual wage: $29,350

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +1.7%

> Typical entry level edu. required: High school diploma or equivalent

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12. Construction laborers

> Unemployment rate: 8.3% (12th highest)

> Labor force: 2.3 million

> Median annual wage: $34,530

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +12.4%

> Typical entry level edu. required: No formal educational credential

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11. Weighers, measurers, checkers, and samplers, recordkeeping

> Unemployment rate: 8.4% (11th highest)

> Labor force: 61,000

> Median annual wage: $30,180

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +1.8%

> Typical entry level edu. required: High school diploma or equivalent

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10. Brickmasons, blockmasons, and stonemasons

> Unemployment rate: 8.8% (10th highest)

> Labor force: 157,000

> Median annual wage: $42,900

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +10.1%

> Typical entry level edu. required: High school diploma or equivalent

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9. Tour and travel guides

> Unemployment rate: 8.9% (9th highest)

> Labor force: 71,000

> Median annual wage: $25,770

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: N/A

> Typical entry level edu. required: N/A

a man standing next to a body of water: > Fatal injuries in 2017: 100.0 per 100,000 workers
> Total: 41 fatal injuries, 120 nonfatal injuries
> Most common fatal accidents: Transportation incidents
> Median annual wage: $28,310
Fishers and related fishing workers had the highest rates of fatal injury in 2017. Commercial fishing is largely physical work that involves fishing nets, gear and slippery decks. Fishers and related fishing workers can also be exposed to challenging environmental factors, such as extreme weather. In addition, workers may be out on the water or working from a remote area when an accident occurs, and easy access to a hospital or medical professional may not be readily available. The majority of fatalities among fishers and related fishing workers are due to drowning. © Ales-A / Getty Images

> Fatal injuries in 2017: 100.0 per 100,000 workers
> Total: 41 fatal injuries, 120 nonfatal injuries
> Most common fatal accidents: Transportation incidents
> Median annual wage: $28,310

Fishers and related fishing workers had the highest rates of fatal injury in 2017. Commercial fishing is largely physical work that involves fishing nets, gear and slippery decks. Fishers and related fishing workers can also be exposed to challenging environmental factors, such as extreme weather. In addition, workers may be out on the water or working from a remote area when an accident occurs, and easy access to a hospital or medical professional may not be readily available. The majority of fatalities among fishers and related fishing workers are due to drowning.

8. Farming, fishing, and forestry occupations

> Unemployment rate: 9.2% (8th highest)

> Labor force: 1.2 million

> Median annual wage: $24,390

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +0.0%

> Typical entry level edu. required: No formal educational credential

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7. Counter attendants, cafeteria, food concession, and coffee shop

> Unemployment rate: 9.4% (7th highest)

> Labor force: 223,000

> Median annual wage: $21,280

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +4.6%

> Typical entry level edu. required: No formal educational credential

a large green field: > Fatal injuries in 2017: 17.7 per 100,000 workers
> Total: 154 fatal injuries, 13,500 nonfatal injuries
> Most common fatal accidents: Transportation incidents
> Median annual wage: $23,710
Approximately half of all fatal injuries affecting miscellaneous agricultural workers were caused by transportation incidents -- many of which involved motorized off-road vehicles, such as tractors. The occupation also results in a relatively large amount of nonfatal injuries at 1,555 for every 100,000 workers -- nearly double the comparable national rate. Many workers employed in dangerous occupations are compensated for the assumed risk with a higher wage, but in addition to being a dangerous job, miscellaneous agricultural workers are the lowest paid of all the jobs on our list. The median annual earnings for someone in this profession is $23,710. © valio84sl / Getty Images

> Fatal injuries in 2017: 17.7 per 100,000 workers
> Total: 154 fatal injuries, 13,500 nonfatal injuries
> Most common fatal accidents: Transportation incidents
> Median annual wage: $23,710

Approximately half of all fatal injuries affecting miscellaneous agricultural workers were caused by transportation incidents -- many of which involved motorized off-road vehicles, such as tractors. The occupation also results in a relatively large amount of nonfatal injuries at 1,555 for every 100,000 workers -- nearly double the comparable national rate. Many workers employed in dangerous occupations are compensated for the assumed risk with a higher wage, but in addition to being a dangerous job, miscellaneous agricultural workers are the lowest paid of all the jobs on our list. The median annual earnings for someone in this profession is $23,710.

6. Miscellaneous agricultural workers

> Unemployment rate: 9.6% (6th highest)

> Labor force: 922,000

> Median annual wage: $30,600

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: N/A

> Typical entry level edu. required: No formal educational credential

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5. Packers and packagers, hand

> Unemployment rate: 9.7% (5th highest)

> Labor force: 672,000

> Median annual wage: $23,430

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +1.8%

> Typical entry level edu. required: No formal educational credential

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4. Telemarketers

> Unemployment rate: 10.5% (4th highest)

> Labor force: 65,000

> Median annual wage: $24,460

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +0.0%

> Typical entry level edu. required: No formal educational credential

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3. Graders and sorters, agricultural products

> Unemployment rate: 11.5% (3rd highest)

> Labor force: 96,000

> Median annual wage: $23,340

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: -0.9%

> Typical entry level edu. required: No formal educational credential

> Fatal injuries in 2017: 45.2 per 100,000 workers
> Total: 91 fatal injuries, 2,810 nonfatal injuries
> Most common fatal accidents: Falls, slips, trips
> Median annual wage: $38,970
Due to the nature of roofing work, a fall, slip, or trip can result in serious injury in ways it would not for a person working on level ground. Roofers can slip from scaffolds, ladders, or roofs, falling to lower levels. Roofers are also at risk of heat-related illnesses from working in the hot sun during summer months.
ALSO READ: Most Common Last Names in the US © Jens_Lambert_Photography / Getty Images

> Fatal injuries in 2017: 45.2 per 100,000 workers
> Total: 91 fatal injuries, 2,810 nonfatal injuries
> Most common fatal accidents: Falls, slips, trips
> Median annual wage: $38,970

Due to the nature of roofing work, a fall, slip, or trip can result in serious injury in ways it would not for a person working on level ground. Roofers can slip from scaffolds, ladders, or roofs, falling to lower levels. Roofers are also at risk of heat-related illnesses from working in the hot sun during summer months.

ALSO READ: Most Common Last Names in the US

2. Roofers

> Unemployment rate: 12.2% (2nd highest)

> Labor force: 229,000

> Median annual wage: $38,970

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +11.1%

> Typical entry level edu. required: No formal educational credential

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1. Dishwashers

> Unemployment rate: 13.9% (the highest)

> Labor force: 306,000

> Median annual wage: $21,500

> Proj. job growth 2016-2026: +4.3%

> Typical entry level edu. required: No formal educational credential

Methodology

To identify the 33 jobs with the best job security and the 33 jobs with the worst job security, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed 2017 unemployment rates for 360 occupations from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. We only considered occupations with a labor force of 50,000 or more. Unemployed members of an occupational labor force need to have been last employed in this occupation prior to unemployment. Employment projections from 2016 through 2026 came from the Occupational Outlook Handbook, published annually by the BLS. Typical entry-level education requirement and median annual wage also came from the BLS. Annual wages exclude those of part-time workers in a given profession. Occupations that represent the remainder of a broader classification, defined by the BLS as “all other,” were excluded from our analysis. Data on median annual wage, 10 year projected job growth, and typical educational attainment required was not always available from the BLS for the exact job listed. We used the data for the closest matching occupational categories in some of those cases when possible.

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