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Familiar Brands You Won’t See at This Year’s Super Bowl

24/7 Tempo Logo By Sam Gupton of 24/7 Tempo | Slide 1 of 9: The price of Super Bowl ads continues to climb despite a continuous decline in viewers over the past five years. This year, a 30-second ad is going for around $6.5 million, nearly $1 million more than last year’s average cost of $5.6 million. (Meanwhile, Super Bowl tickets can cost a few thousand dollars, find out the NFL's most expensive and cheapest tickets.) It can be extremely hard to gauge the effectiveness of television ads, especially in comparison to targeted online advertisements that can be backed up with plenty of data. Using limited resources to buy the most expensive ad space out there might not always be the best investment. This year, some companies that previously advertised at the big game have decided not to run ads. (These are 12 food and drink slogans you can't forget.) Ads aren’t always a sure bet for success, even if they reach their target audience. Last year, third-party delivery app DoorDash was criticized for spending several millions of dollars on an ad to announce that it would be donating $1 million to charity.  Similarly, Chrysler’s truck division, Dodge Ram, was criticized in 2018, when it overlaid shots of its trucks with a soundbite of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. giving a speech. Ironically, King even criticized automobile advertisements in a part of the speech not featured in the commercial. Some of the companies that chose not to advertise this year have been longtime patrons of the Super Bowl. Tide detergent, candy conglomerate Mars Wrigley, and Hyundai have all run several Super Bowl ads in the past and invested a considerable amount into producing commercials. Others, like Chipotle and online service marketplace Fiverr, ran ads for the first time in last year’s game but decided against it this year. To determine the companies opting out of this year’s Super Bowl ads, 24/7 Tempo reviewed a list compiled by marketing news company Adweek on the companies that advertised during previous Super Bowls but are not running a TV spot for Super Bowl LVI in 2022. Data on previous Super Bowl ad count and spending came from Adland and may be incomplete, as there is no information available for many of the early broadcasts.

The price of Super Bowl ads continues to climb despite a continuous decline in viewers over the past five years. This year, a 30-second ad is going for around $6.5 million, nearly $1 million more than last year’s average cost of $5.6 million. (Meanwhile, Super Bowl tickets can cost a few thousand dollars, find out the NFL's most expensive and cheapest tickets.)

It can be extremely hard to gauge the effectiveness of television ads, especially in comparison to targeted online advertisements that can be backed up with plenty of data. Using limited resources to buy the most expensive ad space out there might not always be the best investment. This year, some companies that previously advertised at the big game have decided not to run ads. (These are 12 food and drink slogans you can't forget.)

Ads aren’t always a sure bet for success, even if they reach their target audience. Last year, third-party delivery app DoorDash was criticized for spending several millions of dollars on an ad to announce that it would be donating $1 million to charity. 

Similarly, Chrysler’s truck division, Dodge Ram, was criticized in 2018, when it overlaid shots of its trucks with a soundbite of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. giving a speech. Ironically, King even criticized automobile advertisements in a part of the speech not featured in the commercial.

Some of the companies that chose not to advertise this year have been longtime patrons of the Super Bowl. Tide detergent, candy conglomerate Mars Wrigley, and Hyundai have all run several Super Bowl ads in the past and invested a considerable amount into producing commercials. Others, like Chipotle and online service marketplace Fiverr, ran ads for the first time in last year’s game but decided against it this year.

To determine the companies opting out of this year’s Super Bowl ads, 24/7 Tempo reviewed a list compiled by marketing news company Adweek on the companies that advertised during previous Super Bowls but are not running a TV spot for Super Bowl LVI in 2022. Data on previous Super Bowl ad count and spending came from Adland and may be incomplete, as there is no information available for many of the early broadcasts.

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