You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

How Southwest, Spirit and Other Airlines Have Fared in 2020

GOBankingRates Logo By John Csiszar of GOBankingRates | Slide 1 of 22: The state of the American airline industry is one of chaos and concern. While many industries are grappling with coronavirus-related issues that threaten their existence, few have been rocked like the airline companies. Flying — with packed seats and recirculating air — presents a threat to everyone on board if even one passenger has COVID-19. The only choice for the industry has been to radically change the process, requiring airlines to limit bookings to ensure passengers can remain socially distanced. And passengers can’t forget their face masks. While an initial $25 billion federal bailout helped prevent airline companies from laying off workers, those funds expired in September, and furloughs began Oct. 1. American and United have furloughed more than 32,000 employees overall, and Congress and the White House remain at an impasse regarding any potential future aid. So how are airlines faring now, with so much uncertainty swirling about the future? One way to take their temperature is to look at stock prices — specifically, how they’ve changed in 2020. Here’s a closer look at how stock prices have changed this year for all major airlines as they grapple with historic instability. Last updated: Oct. 23, 2020

The state of the American airline industry is one of chaos and concern. While many industries are grappling with coronavirus-related issues that threaten their existence, few have been rocked like the airline companies. Flying — with packed seats and recirculating air — presents a threat to everyone on board if even one passenger has COVID-19. The only choice for the industry has been to radically change the process, requiring airlines to limit bookings to ensure passengers can remain socially distanced. And passengers can’t forget their face masks.

While an initial $25 billion federal bailout helped prevent airline companies from laying off workers, those funds expired in September, and furloughs began Oct. 1. American and United have furloughed more than 32,000 employees overall, and Congress and the White House remain at an impasse regarding any potential future aid.

So how are airlines faring now, with so much uncertainty swirling about the future? One way to take their temperature is to look at stock prices — specifically, how they’ve changed in 2020. Here’s a closer look at how stock prices have changed this year for all major airlines as they grapple with historic instability.

Last updated: Oct. 23, 2020

© Markus Mainka / Shutterstock.com
AdChoices

More from GOBankingRates

GOBankingRates
GOBankingRates
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon