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The world's largest plane engine just received certification to power the new flagship airliner Boeing hopes will be its redemption, the 777X

Business Insider Logo By tpallini@businessinsider.com (Thomas Pallini) of Business Insider | Slide 1 of 37:  GE Aviation's new GE9X engine just received clearance to fly by the Federal Aviation Administration. Boeing selected General Electric to build the engines for its new 777X in 2013 and the result would be the world's largest jet engine.  The GE9X will exclusively power the 777X and offer increased fuel efficiency and over 100,000 pounds of thrust. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. The world's largest plane engine was just cleared to fly by the Federal Aviation Administration, paving the way for the commercial launch of the world's largest twin-engine passenger jet in 2022. General Electric's aviation subsidiary, GE Aviation, is celebrating the milestone with its massive new GE9X engine that will soon fly thousands of passengers around the world every day. It's the exclusive engine for the Boeing 777X, a next-generation version of the manufacturer's famed 777 wide-body aircraft used by the likes of American Airlines, British Airways, and Emirates.Boeing first gave GE Aviation the exclusive contract to develop and build the engines for the 777X in 2013. A likely match, GE Aviation currently make the GE90 engines that are used by some airlines currently flying the 777, including Qatar Airways which operates the world's longest 777 route between Doha, Qatar, and Auckland, New Zealand. The engine's certification brings Boeing one step closer to delivering the finished product to launch customer Emirates in 2022. The coronavirus pandemic has slowed enthusiasm for new aircraft deliveries but the 777X is a feat of engineering that offers a 400-seat passenger cabin and increased fuel efficiency at a time when airlines need it the most. Take a closer look at the GE Aviation GE9X engine. Read the original article on Business Insider

The world's largest plane engine just received certification to power the new flagship airliner Boeing hopes will be its redemption, the 777X

  • GE Aviation's new GE9X engine just received clearance to fly by the Federal Aviation Administration.
  • Boeing selected General Electric to build the engines for its new 777X in 2013 and the result would be the world's largest jet engine. 
  • The GE9X will exclusively power the 777X and offer increased fuel efficiency and over 100,000 pounds of thrust.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

The world's largest plane engine was just cleared to fly by the Federal Aviation Administration, paving the way for the commercial launch of the world's largest twin-engine passenger jet in 2022. 

General Electric's aviation subsidiary, GE Aviation, is celebrating the milestone with its massive new GE9X engine that will soon fly thousands of passengers around the world every day. It's the exclusive engine for the Boeing 777X, a next-generation version of the manufacturer's famed 777 wide-body aircraft used by the likes of American Airlines, British Airways, and Emirates.

Boeing first gave GE Aviation the exclusive contract to develop and build the engines for the 777X in 2013. A likely match, GE Aviation currently make the GE90 engines that are used by some airlines currently flying the 777, including Qatar Airways which operates the world's longest 777 route between Doha, Qatar, and Auckland, New Zealand. 

The engine's certification brings Boeing one step closer to delivering the finished product to launch customer Emirates in 2022. The coronavirus pandemic has slowed enthusiasm for new aircraft deliveries but the 777X is a feat of engineering that offers a 400-seat passenger cabin and increased fuel efficiency at a time when airlines need it the most. 

Take a closer look at the GE Aviation GE9X engine. 

Read the original article on Business Insider
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