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10 Cities Where People Spend the Most on Healthcare

Money Talks News Logo By Jon Ward of Money Talks News | Slide 1 of 13: Editor's Note: This story originally appeared on Sidecar Health. Over the past year, COVID-19 has put a spotlight on public health and the economy, emphasizing how important it is for people to have access to high-quality healthcare that they can afford. The government and many insurers have worked to ensure that treatment related to COVID-19 itself is affordable, but the pandemic may have other long-range impacts on healthcare economics in the future. Many people have lost employer insurance coverage or the income to afford insurance as a result of COVID-19’s economic shocks, and even when the threat of the pandemic passes, those who contracted COVID-19 may carry long-term heart, lung, and brain conditions related to the disease. These effects could increase the cost of care or make it more difficult for people to afford the healthcare they need. On the flip side, many health providers have been pushed to adopt telemedicine at a wide scale during the pandemic, a development that could lead to future cost savings for some forms of care. How these potential shifts play out is important because U.S. households already face tremendous barriers to accessing and affording healthcare. Despite the Affordable Care Act’s successes in reducing the number of uninsured in America since 2010, around 29 million people still lack insurance coverage. Troublingly, spending on healthcare continues to increase whether people are insured or not. The ACA’s failures to slow the increase in health spending are evident by multiple measures. Household healthcare spending as a share of income increased from 5% to 6.3% between 2009—the last year before the ACA’s passage—and 2019. In dollars, individual spending is up from $1,250 per person per year to $2,077 over the same span, while spending per household has increased from $3,126 to $5,193. The main driver of this increase in health spending is not new treatments, devices, drugs, or other innovations to improve quality; it’s the cost of health insurance coverage. Health insurance spending as a share of total health spending has creeped upward over the last decade, from 57% in 2009 to 67% in 2019. While the insurance exchanges in the ACA were intended to contain or even reduce insurance costs, spending on insurance has nearly doubled since 2009, from $714 to $1,412. It’s not the usual blah, blah, blah. Click here to sign up for our free newsletter. Sponsored: How to find cheaper car insurance in minutes Getting a better deal on car insurance doesn’t have to be hard. You can have The Zebra, an insurance comparison site, compare quotes in just a few minutes and find you the best rates. Consumers save up to $670 per year, according to the site, so if you’re ready to secure your new rate, get started now.

10 Cities Where People Spend the Most on Healthcare

Editor's Note: This story originally appeared on Sidecar Health.

Over the past year, COVID-19 has put a spotlight on public health and the economy, emphasizing how important it is for people to have access to high-quality healthcare that they can afford.

The government and many insurers have worked to ensure that treatment related to COVID-19 itself is affordable, but the pandemic may have other long-range impacts on healthcare economics in the future. Many people have lost employer insurance coverage or the income to afford insurance as a result of COVID-19’s economic shocks, and even when the threat of the pandemic passes, those who contracted COVID-19 may carry long-term heart, lung, and brain conditions related to the disease. These effects could increase the cost of care or make it more difficult for people to afford the healthcare they need. On the flip side, many health providers have been pushed to adopt telemedicine at a wide scale during the pandemic, a development that could lead to future cost savings for some forms of care.

How these potential shifts play out is important because U.S. households already face tremendous barriers to accessing and affording healthcare. Despite the Affordable Care Act’s successes in reducing the number of uninsured in America since 2010, around 29 million people still lack insurance coverage. Troublingly, spending on healthcare continues to increase whether people are insured or not.

The ACA’s failures to slow the increase in health spending are evident by multiple measures. Household healthcare spending as a share of income increased from 5% to 6.3% between 2009—the last year before the ACA’s passage—and 2019. In dollars, individual spending is up from $1,250 per person per year to $2,077 over the same span, while spending per household has increased from $3,126 to $5,193.

The main driver of this increase in health spending is not new treatments, devices, drugs, or other innovations to improve quality; it’s the cost of health insurance coverage. Health insurance spending as a share of total health spending has creeped upward over the last decade, from 57% in 2009 to 67% in 2019. While the insurance exchanges in the ACA were intended to contain or even reduce insurance costs, spending on insurance has nearly doubled since 2009, from $714 to $1,412.

It’s not the usual blah, blah, blah. Click here to sign up for our free newsletter.

Sponsored: How to find cheaper car insurance in minutes

Getting a better deal on car insurance doesn’t have to be hard. You can have The Zebra, an insurance comparison site, compare quotes in just a few minutes and find you the best rates. Consumers save up to $670 per year, according to the site, so if you’re ready to secure your new rate, get started now.

© Elnur / Shutterstock.com

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