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Consumer Return and Refund Laws by State

GOBankingRates Logo By Beverly Bird of GOBankingRates | Slide 1 of 51: We all make the occasional purchase that leaves us feeling ripped off. Perhaps you buy something only to discover later that you paid more than the advertised price. Or maybe the package labeling is misleading, or you buy a car that is a lemon and will cost you a small fortune to fix.The Federal Trade Commission enforces laws to protect consumers in these situations. For example, regardless of where you live, the FTC's "cooling-off rule" gives you three days to cancel many — but not all — sales made at:Your homeYour dormitoryYour workplaceA seller’s temporary location, such as a hotel room, convention center, fairground or restaurantThe rule also applies when salespeople make presentations in your home, although not all sales are covered. In fact, there are many exceptions to the cooling-off rule, so you might want to check out the FTC website for more details.Many states have their own laws that govern these and other types of sales, including sales at a retailer's place of business. Some states have stricter laws than others. Here is a breakdown of what you can expect in each state. Related: Product Warranties, Insurance and More: Are These Extras Really Worth the Cost?

Consumer Return and Refund Laws by State

We all make the occasional purchase that leaves us feeling ripped off. Perhaps you buy something only to discover later that you paid more than the advertised price. Or maybe the package labeling is misleading, or you buy a car that is a lemon and will cost you a small fortune to fix.

The Federal Trade Commission enforces laws to protect consumers in these situations. For example, regardless of where you live, the FTC's "cooling-off rule" gives you three days to cancel many — but not all — sales made at:

Your homeYour dormitoryYour workplaceA seller’s temporary location, such as a hotel room, convention center, fairground or restaurant

The rule also applies when salespeople make presentations in your home, although not all sales are covered. In fact, there are many exceptions to the cooling-off rule, so you might want to check out the FTC website for more details.

Many states have their own laws that govern these and other types of sales, including sales at a retailer's place of business. Some states have stricter laws than others. Here is a breakdown of what you can expect in each state.

Related: Product Warranties, Insurance and More: Are These Extras Really Worth the Cost?

© Iakov Filimonov / Shutterstock.com

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