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Louisville police in 'dire straits' as officer retirements and resignations surge while violent crime also spikes

Washington Examiner logo Washington Examiner 4/28/2021 Andrew Mark Miller
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The Louisville Police Department lost nearly 190 police officers last year and continues to bleed available resources in an exodus that police leadership is referring to as “dire.”

Kentucky’s largest city lost 188 police officers due to retirement or resignation in 2020, while 43 officers have stepped away so far this year.

"I would say that we’re in dire straits," Louisville police union press secretary Dave Mutchler said. "Our manpower is critically low.”

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Mutchler said a contributing factor to the loss of available manpower is that “the climate we currently find ourselves in” has negatively affected recruiting and the “the pool of people wanting to become officers is shrinking every day."

"We can't emphasize enough how critically and dangerously low our manpower is, and interestingly enough, those who would break the law are paying attention to that," Mutchler added. "Our homicide rates and our violent crime rates are through the roof."

Crime has indeed increased in Louisville to the tune of 84% more nonfatal shootings this year compared to last year and a 75% increase in murders from 2020.

The Louisville police are currently being investigated by President Joe Biden’s Justice Department after the shooting death of 26-year-old Breonna Taylor in March of last year that occurred as police were attempting to serve a warrant.

"It will determine whether LMPD engages in unconstitutional stops, searches and seizures, as well as whether the department unlawfully executes search warrants on private homes," Attorney General Merrick Garland said during a Monday news conference.

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Police departments across the country have been experiencing high rates of resignations and retirements, including in Seattle and New York City, where social justice turmoil and budget cuts have contributed to a decrease in available police officers.

“Cops are forming a conga line down at the pension section, and I don’t blame them,” Joseph Giacalone, a retired NYPD sergeant and an adjunct professor at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, said about the 75% increase in NYPD officers retiring or quitting.

Tags: News, Louisville, Police, Black Lives Matter

Original Author: Andrew Mark Miller

Original Location: Louisville police in 'dire straits' as officer retirements and resignations surge while violent crime also spikes

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