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Mayor asks for Minnesota attorney general to take up Daunte Wright shooting case

POLITICO logo POLITICO 4/13/2021 By Quint Forgey
a man wearing a hat: Mayor Mike Elliott speaks during a press conference about the death of 20-year-old Daunte Wright on April 12, 2021 in Brooklyn Center, Minn. © Stephen Maturen/Getty Images Mayor Mike Elliott speaks during a press conference about the death of 20-year-old Daunte Wright on April 12, 2021 in Brooklyn Center, Minn.

The mayor of Brooklyn Center, Minn., announced on Tuesday that he had asked Gov. Tim Walz to reassign the case of Daunte Wright, a 20-year-old Black man shot and killed by police during a traffic stop, to the state attorney general.

The request from Mayor Mike Elliott is the latest local development since Wright was killed on Sunday, sparking two consecutive nights of unrest in the Minneapolis suburb — a short distance from where George Floyd was killed by police last May and where former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin is now standing trial on murder and manslaughter charges.

At a news briefing on Monday, Brooklyn Center Police Chief Tim Gannon released video of Wright’s traffic stop obtained from Officer Kim Potter’s body camera, which showed Potter shooting Wright. But Gannon said he believed that the shooting was an accident and that Potter meant to deploy her taser when she discharged her gun instead.

Elliott had said he supported Potter’s removal from the force, but Gannon and City Manager Curt Boganey declined on Monday to go as far as the mayor in calling for her firing. Later Monday, Elliott announced that Boganey had been relieved of his duties, expanding the mayor’s control over the police department.

By Tuesday afternoon, both Gannon and Potter had resigned, while Elliott indicated that Potter would face court proceedings for her role in the shooting — which Gannon previously said the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension was investigating.

“There’s going to be a process where the officer is going to be in court and is going to go through the legal system to determine guilt or innocence,” Elliott told “CBS This Morning.”

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