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Mendenhall calls for transparency after officer shoots teen in Salt Lake City

Deseret News logo Deseret News 9/7/2020 Ashley Imlay
a traffic light at night: Police respond to 500 S. Navajo St. after an officer shot and injured a teenager who police said was experiencing a violent psychological episode on Friday, Sept. 4, 2020. © Jay Hancock, Deseret News Police respond to 500 S. Navajo St. after an officer shot and injured a teenager who police said was experiencing a violent psychological episode on Friday, Sept. 4, 2020.

SALT LAKE CITY — As police remained quiet over the weekend after an officer shot and injured a teenage boy Friday night, Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall called for a fast and transparent investigation.

“While the full details of this incident are yet to be released as an investigation takes place, I will say that I am thankful this young boy is alive and no one else was injured. No matter the circumstances, what happened on Friday night is a tragedy and I expect this investigation to be handled swiftly and transparently for the sake of everyone involved,” Mendenhall said Sunday in a statement released by her spokeswoman.

On Friday, officers were called to 500 S. Navajo St., where police said the teenager had threatened others with a weapon during what officers described as a “psychological episode.”

When officers arrived, the teen ran away, police have said. During a short foot pursuit, one officer shot him. No details were released about what prompted the officer to shoot or the boy’s injuries.

The boy was hospitalized in serious condition. Updates on his condition as of Sunday had not been released, nor had any additional details about the shooting.

The exact age of the teenager has also not been released, but people on social media who say they’re related to the boy describe him as 13 years old.

In August, Mendenhall issued an executive order changing the city’s use of force protocol, how police conduct search and seizures, and how the department will discipline officers who either fail to activate or intentionally deactivate their body camera. The new policies went into effect Saturday.

The changes prompted criticism from the Salt Lake Police Association, which called them “superfluous” and accused the mayor of disparaging city employees.

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