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Race faker Rachel Dolezal says she can't find a job six years on

Daily Mail logo Daily Mail 2/12/2021 Frances Mulraney For Dailymail.com
Rachel Dolezal, Rachel Dolezal posing for the camera: MailOnline logo © Provided by Daily Mail MailOnline logo

Race faker Rachel Dolezal has claimed she has been unable to find a job over the past six years after it was revealed that she was a white woman pretending to be black.

Dolezal, 43, told TV host Tamron Hall that even after changing her name to Nkechi Amare Diallo - a West African way of saying 'gift from the gods' – in 2017, she is still recognized and never gets past the interview stage.

The former NAACP leader, who says she still sees herself as black, claimed it has been 'really tough' and that she wishes 'people could see me more for who I am than the what'.

Even after moving to Tucson, Arizona, last year where her teenage son was going to college, the single mother-of-three said she has been forced to 'create my own job and find my own ways to provide for my children' as she braids hair, writes grants, paints and delivers 'pep talks'. She moved from Spokane, Washington.

Rachel Dolezal posing for the camera: Race faker Rachel Dolezal (pictured) has claimed she has been unable to find a job over the past six years after it was revealed that she was a white woman pretending to be black

Race faker Rachel Dolezal (pictured) has claimed she has been unable to find a job over the past six years after it was revealed that she was a white woman pretending to be black
© Provided by Daily Mail

Hall questioned Dolezal about her hair and the former NAACP leader claimed that she was wearing it in braids to advertise her business of hair braiding as she had not been able to find other jobs.

'I'm in braids right now - and for a practical reason: advertising what I do to provide for my children,' Dolezal said, as she appeared on the show with a map of Africa in the background. 'I've been braiding for over 20 years.'

'I started with applying for all of the things I was qualified for,' she said of her job prospects, 'and after interviews and getting turned down, I even applied to jobs that didn't even require degrees ... being a maid at a hotel, working at a casino. 

'I wasn't able to get any of those jobs either.'

Dolezal said that employers never told her the scandal about her false identity was the reason why she didn't get a job but that it was hard when the internet contained information that was 'inaccurate about your life story'.

Dolezal pushed her book as she claimed it was the only 'true place' for her story and complained that 'people aren't going to seek out my book if they're just looking for an employee'.

'A mother, an activist, and an artist … that's really who I am,' Dolezal continued.

'When it comes to race and identity, I've always identified racially as "human" but have found more of a home in black culture and the black community, and that hasn't changed.

'I'm still the same person I was in May of 2015 I'm still doing the work I'm still pressing forward but it has been really tough for sure.

Rachel Dolezal posing for the camera: Dolezal, pictured, said that she wears her hair in braids to advertise her business © Provided by Daily Mail Dolezal, pictured, said that she wears her hair in braids to advertise her business a man and a woman sitting at a table with a plate of food: Dolezal claims she has struggled for work and to provide for her three sons © Provided by Daily Mail Dolezal claims she has struggled for work and to provide for her three sons

INFAMOUS 'RACE FAKERS' IN THE US

Rachel Dolezal - former college professor and NAACP activist known for identifying as a black woman despite having been born to white parents. She was 'outed' in 2015.

Jessica Krug - a white professor of African American studies at George Washington University confessed in a Medium post earlier in September 2020 that she had been faking being black for years, and was in fact a Jewish woman from Kansas.   

Satchuel Cole - born Jennifer Lynn Benton, the Indiana-based activist and member of Black Lives Matter admitted in a Facebook post in September 2020 to having 'taken up space as a Black person while knowing I am white'. 

CV Vitolo-Haddad - she resigned from her teaching job at the University of Wisconsin-Madison after admitting in September 2020 that she pretended on multiple occasions to be black or Latino. She is actually Southern Italian and Sicilian.

Hilaria Baldwin - the wife of actor Alec Baldwin was born in Boston to American parents, but changed her name from Hilary in 2009. She has claimed to be Spanish, because her parents live there and she spent time there as a child. She was 'outed' in December 2020. 

Natasha Lycia Ora Bannan - in January 2021 the prominent human rights lawyer admitted that she was not a Latina, but was born to white parents in Georgia. 

'Not having a job for six years, having to create my own job and find my own ways to provide for my children through braiding hair, through grant writing to bring funds into marginalized communities and black-owned businesses and non-profits, through painting, through doing pep talks on Cameo.com,' she added.

Dolezal said that she had hoped by changing her name three years ago to Nkechi Amare Diallo – which she claimed was given to her by an Igbo man – things would change but that she was still recognized.

'I really wanted to be seen for my qualification when I applied for a job and as it turns out, when I turn up for the interview, I'm still me … a lot of people knew my face so I didn't move past that interview stage,' she admitted. 

Dolezal said she still remains hopeful, however, after moving to Arizona last year and had 'revamped her resume' and would be looking for teaching jobs in the fall. 

The infamous race faker - who has said she is 'transracial', equating her experience to that of being transgender - remained defiant in talking to Hall, stating that she couldn't change who she is and would not bow to pressure.

'It's definitely been a long six years,' said Dolezal, 'but I really strongly believe that as a person, you have to just continue to be who you are. And you can't change who you are.'

'It's more a story of becoming than changing,' she hit back as Hall said that she had previously changed to try to pass as a black woman.

'It's more a story of finding a home culturally. It's not somehow pretending, faking or changing, it's just becoming and if I have changed then there would be this flip flopping or maybe I would have scraped everything under pressure.

'This is really just who I am so I believe that if I'm going to continue to live, I'm going to continue to be who I am in the midst of pressure.'

Dolezal added that it was 'really tough' to be targeted online as more race fakers emerged last year.

'If somebody's name comes up attached to what people feel is a problematic identity then there are hashtags and there are memes,' she said.

In 2015, a local news reporter in Washington 'outed' Dolezal after revealing her Montana parents, Ruthanne and Lawrence Dolezal, were both white.

High school pictures emerged of Dolezal - before she had made attempts to cast herself as a black woman - with blond hair.

Rachel Dolezal posing for the camera © Provided by Daily Mail a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Rachel Dolezal pictured in March 2015 after she received a racist and threatening package. This protest took place before it was revealed she is a white woman and not black © Provided by Daily Mail Rachel Dolezal pictured in March 2015 after she received a racist and threatening package. This protest took place before it was revealed she is a white woman and not black

She was sacked from her job with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and subsequently dismissed from her position as an Instructor in Africana Studies at Eastern Washington University.

The controversial 'civil rights activist' would later argue that she was 'transracial' and has said she did nothing wrong in not correcting 'assumptions' that she is black.

Dolezal began to try and rebuild her image with a Netflix documentary in 2018, The Rachel Divide.

She then attempted to generate some income writing a memoir entitled In Full Color, but things fell apart once again after being accused of welfare fraud for failing to report $84,000 in earnings to Washington State's Department of Social and Health Services.

Rachel Dolezal posing for the camera: Dolezal wrote a memoir in 2017 almost two years after the controversy about her racial identity in June 2015 © Provided by Daily Mail Dolezal wrote a memoir in 2017 almost two years after the controversy about her racial identity in June 2015

In May 2018, Dolezal was charged with theft by welfare fraud, perjury and false verification for public assistance.

Court documents alleged that she illegally received $8,747 in food assistance and $100 in childcare assistance from August 2015 through November 2017.

Dolezal settled in a Washington court in April, agreeing to pay an undisclosed restitution and complete 120 hours of community service.

She was previously married to a black man, Kevin Moore, who she divorced in 2005. The mother of three sons claims she was 'too black' for him.

'Race faking' has become a more frequently exposed phenomenon in the United States.

In January, Natasha Lycia Ora Bannan, senior counsel at the Latino Justice Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund, revealed that she is white despite having claimed Puerto Rican and Colombian heritage.

Just last September, a community activist from Indiana who campaigned for racial justice outed herself after posing as a black person for years despite being white.

Satchuel Cole, born Jennifer Lynn Benton, admitted in a Facebook post to having 'taken up space as a Black person while knowing I am white'.

The activist, from Indianapolis, was a member of the Indy10 Black Lives Matter group and in 2017 acted as a spokesperson for the family of Aaron Bailey, who was shot and killed by police following a traffic stop in June 2017.

a girl in a blue shirt: Natasha Lycia Ora Bannan, 43, has admitted that she is not Latina having assumed the identity © Provided by Daily Mail Natasha Lycia Ora Bannan, 43, has admitted that she is not Latina having assumed the identity Satchuel Cole was born Jennifer Lynn Benton © Provided by Daily Mail Satchuel Cole was born Jennifer Lynn Benton

That same week, University of Wisconsin-Madison graduate student CV Vitolo-Haddad resigned from a teaching role after admitting to lying about being black.

Vitolo-Haddad pretended on multiple occasions to be black or Latino although the teacher is actually Southern Italian and Sicilian.

Vitolo-Haddad confessed to the deception in two Medium blog posts and apologized for 'every ounce of heartbreak and betrayal' caused by the false claims.

Jessica Krug, 38, a white professor of African American studies confessed in a Medium post earlier in September that she had been faking being black for years.

The professor at George Washington University admitted she had deceived colleagues and students for years.

Krug grew up as a white Jewish child in Kansas City but assumed a series of different black identities throughout her career, she confessed in a Medium blog post on September 3.

Krug resigned from her role at the university following a backlash over the deception.

Michelle Moyd, the Ruth N. Halls Associate Professor in the Department of History at IU, said that the recent spike in the exposure of race fakers will have extremely negative effects on the black community.

'Each time one of these frauds is exposed, the people around them are left to pick up the pieces,' she said.

a person posing for the camera: CV Vitolo-Haddad (pictured), a University of Wisconsin-Madison graduate student, has resigned from a teaching role after admitting to lying about being black © Provided by Daily Mail CV Vitolo-Haddad (pictured), a University of Wisconsin-Madison graduate student, has resigned from a teaching role after admitting to lying about being black a person standing in front of a computer: Dr Jessica Krug resigned from George Washington University after lying about being black © Provided by Daily Mail Dr Jessica Krug resigned from George Washington University after lying about being black Read more
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