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Virginia lawmakers vote to reform 224-year-old jury sentencing law

Richmond-Petersburg WWBT logo Richmond-Petersburg WWBT 10/17/2020 Ned Oliver
a person walking down a sidewalk: A police officer walks into the John Marshall Courthouse in downtown Richmond. © Provided by Richmond-Petersburg WWBT A police officer walks into the John Marshall Courthouse in downtown Richmond.

Virginia lawmakers passed a closely watched bill Friday aimed at ensuring people can exercise their right to a jury trial without risking much steeper punishments.

Criminal justice reform advocates frequently called the legislation one of the most important changes the General Assembly could adopt during a special legislative session that has been largely devoted to issues of policing, courts and prisons.

“Everything else is window dressing compared to this bill,” said Sen. Joe Morrissey, D-Richmond, who proposed the measure. “The result will be an end to excessive sentencing in the Commonwealth of Virginia.”

Virginia and Kentucky are currently the only two states where if a defendant or prosecutor asks for a jury trial, the jury must also hand down the sentence. If signed by the governor, Morrissey’s bill will transfer sentencing responsibilities to the judge unless a defendant specifically requests it be set by the jury.

The state’s unusual approach to sentencing dates to 1796 and has been called the jury penalty because it often leads to criminal sentences that are significantly longer than defendants would have faced if they had opted for a trial before a judge or taken a prosecutor’s plea deal.

That’s because unlike judges, juries must hand down sentences that fall within statutory sentencing ranges. And unlike judges, juries aren’t provided the sentencing guidelines that tell them what the typical punishment is for a similarly situated defendant.

That means a defendant facing a robbery or drug distribution charge would face a five year mandatory sentence if a jury finds him guilty, whereas a judge issuing the sentence could suspend time based on the facts of the case and mitigating circumstances.

Juries exceeded sentencing guidelines in half of the cases they heard in 2018, according to the Virginia Sentencing Commission, which found they issued prison sentences that were on average four years longer than would have been recommended. Judges, meanwhile, handed down sentences that exceeded guidelines in just 9 percent of cases.

Lawmakers and advocates say prosecutors often take advantage of the arrangement by tacking on charges with steep mandatory penalties and threatening to demand a jury trial if the defendant doesn’t accept a plea agreement.

READ MORE AT VIRGINIAMERCURY.COM>>>

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