You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

4 Words the Dictionary Says You Should Stop Using

Best Life Logo By Zachary Mack of Best Life | Slide 1 of 5: The way we communicate is constantly changing and so are the very words we use to do so. Sometimes new verbiage is created to catch up with evolving technology, and sometimes we change old language to remove stigma or cultural insensitivities. With a year like 2020 being so full of historic events and societal changes, we've been doing a lot of reexamination. So it's no wonder the indispensable Dictionary.com has released its biggest update ever this year. Not only were 650 new entries added to the site, but 15,000 definitions were also updated—and that includes Dictionary.com dropping some everyday words entirely."The unprecedented events of 2020, from the pandemic to the protests, have profoundly changed our lives—and language," the site's managers wrote in a blog post announcing the update. "A great many of these entries we've updated address topics that touch all of us on the most personal levels: race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, health, and wellness."So which terms have been shelved? These are four words Dictionary.com says you should stop using if you haven't already. And for more ways to freshen up your vocabulary, check out The 50 Most Beautiful Words in the English Language—And How to Use Them.

4 Words the Dictionary Says You Should Stop Using

The way we communicate is constantly changing and so are the very words we use to do so. Sometimes new verbiage is created to catch up with evolving technology, and sometimes we change old language to remove stigma or cultural insensitivities. With a year like 2020 being so full of historic events and societal changes, we've been doing a lot of reexamination. So it's no wonder the indispensable Dictionary.com has released its biggest update ever this year. Not only were 650 new entries added to the site, but 15,000 definitions were also updated—and that includes Dictionary.com dropping some everyday words entirely.

"The unprecedented events of 2020, from the pandemic to the protests, have profoundly changed our lives—and language," the site's managers wrote in a blog post announcing the update. "A great many of these entries we've updated address topics that touch all of us on the most personal levels: race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, health, and wellness."

So which terms have been shelved? These are four words Dictionary.com says you should stop using if you haven't already. And for more ways to freshen up your vocabulary, check out The 50 Most Beautiful Words in the English Language—And How to Use Them.

© Provided by Best Life

More from Best Life

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon