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Lake staff captures close-ups of cottonmouth snake on camera

mySA logo mySA 9/11/2017 By Kelsey Bradshaw, San Antonio Express-News

A venomous snake was spotted slithering at an East Texas lake Sunday and parks employees managed to capture a handful of close-up photos of the serpent.

Lake Somerville Birch Creek State Park employees shared photos of a cottonmouth snake found at the nature area on Sunday.

"Cottonmouth on the prowl today at Lake Somerville," reads the Facebook post.

The photos have been shared more than 25 times and has accumulated dozens of comments from users, some fearful of the reptile and others who wondered how employees captured the cottonmouth on camera.

"Yikes," one said.

"How did you get these pictures," another asked.

Cottonmouth snakes are typically found on the state's Eastern side in swamps and waterways, coastal marshes, rivers, ponds and streams, according to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Somerville Lake is located just south of College Station near Brenham.

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Lake Somerville Birch Creek State Park: "Cottonmouth on the prowl today at Lake Somerville." © Facebook/Lake Somerville Birch Creek State Park Lake Somerville Birch Creek State Park: "Cottonmouth on the prowl today at Lake Somerville."

Cottonmouths are venomous and are usually dark brown, olive-brown, olive green or mostly black and can be 3.5 feet long, according to the parks department.

Lake Somerville Birch Creek State Park: "Cottonmouth on the prowl today at Lake Somerville." © Facebook/Lake Somerville Birch Creek State Park Lake Somerville Birch Creek State Park: "Cottonmouth on the prowl today at Lake Somerville." Lake Somerville Birch Creek State Park: "Cottonmouth on the prowl today at Lake Somerville." © Facebook/Lake Somerville Birch Creek State Park Lake Somerville Birch Creek State Park: "Cottonmouth on the prowl today at Lake Somerville."

"They are marked with wide, dark bands, which are more distinct in some individuals than in others," reads a description of the serpent on the TPWD website.

kbradshaw@express-news.net

Twitter: @kbrad5

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