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This Is the Most Annoying Text You’re Sending All the Time

Best Life Logo By Kali Coleman of Best Life | Slide 1 of 5: Technology has surely changed the way we communicate. A simple text can be sent and received within seconds—making communication faster and more efficient than ever. But anything that comes so easily is bound to have its own set of problems. In fact, one of those problems may be that you're coming across more annoying than you mean to be. After all, like any form of communication, there is a set of unwritten etiquette rules that comes with texting. And experts say you may be breaking them by sending this annoying text: "Call me.""If you are texting 'call me' without any more information or context cues, you are likely creating anxiety for the recipient," says Christine Scott-Hudson, MFT, licensed psychotherapist and owner of Create Your Life Studio.Asking someone just to call you without context likely opens a "Pandora's box of worry" for the other person, says Scott-Hudson. If they don't have time to immediately call you, their brain will often make up and fill in possibilities of what your text could be about. And the possibilities they conjure up probably aren't the most reassuring.While this text can create anxious feelings for anyone, Scott-Hudson says this is especially hard for people who already suffer from certain issues like anxiety, autism, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).Technology expert Daniel Foley also points out that texting has made it difficult to read people's tone, as you can't hear their voice or see how they're saying what they're saying. He says you should "always include context with texts like these," as the person receiving your text might be unsure if you're asking to talk to them in a positive or negative manner.But the potential to induce anxiety aside, this text also often makes you seem ungrateful of the other person's time, Scott-Hudson says. After all, she says, "People are busy. People need to prioritize calls back. If you don't say what the matter is about, they don't know where to place you on the list."This doesn't mean you can't text someone to schedule a time to talk on the phone, especially if the conversation requires more depth than texting allows. Scott-Hudson says you should just provide a little more information in your text."Be specific. A better text is 'Let's talk about carpooling for Theresa's party,' or 'Let's check in about what I can bring,'" she explains. "This not only informs the person you are texting as to the topic of conversation, but allows them to respond back in a way they feel most comfortable, whether it is a text, email, or phone call."This is just one texting etiquette rule you may be breaking, however. For more ways you could be annoying people with your texts, read on. And for other communication errors to avoid, People Don't Trust You If You Text With This Punctuation Mark, Study Says.

This Is the Most Annoying Text You’re Sending All the Time

Technology has surely changed the way we communicate. A simple text can be sent and received within seconds—making communication faster and more efficient than ever. But anything that comes so easily is bound to have its own set of problems. In fact, one of those problems may be that you're coming across more annoying than you mean to be. After all, like any form of communication, there is a set of unwritten etiquette rules that comes with texting. And experts say you may be breaking them by sending this annoying text: "Call me."

"If you are texting 'call me' without any more information or context cues, you are likely creating anxiety for the recipient," says Christine Scott-Hudson, MFT, licensed psychotherapist and owner of Create Your Life Studio.

Asking someone just to call you without context likely opens a "Pandora's box of worry" for the other person, says Scott-Hudson. If they don't have time to immediately call you, their brain will often make up and fill in possibilities of what your text could be about. And the possibilities they conjure up probably aren't the most reassuring.

While this text can create anxious feelings for anyone, Scott-Hudson says this is especially hard for people who already suffer from certain issues like anxiety, autism, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Technology expert Daniel Foley also points out that texting has made it difficult to read people's tone, as you can't hear their voice or see how they're saying what they're saying. He says you should "always include context with texts like these," as the person receiving your text might be unsure if you're asking to talk to them in a positive or negative manner.

But the potential to induce anxiety aside, this text also often makes you seem ungrateful of the other person's time, Scott-Hudson says. After all, she says, "People are busy. People need to prioritize calls back. If you don't say what the matter is about, they don't know where to place you on the list."

This doesn't mean you can't text someone to schedule a time to talk on the phone, especially if the conversation requires more depth than texting allows. Scott-Hudson says you should just provide a little more information in your text.

"Be specific. A better text is 'Let's talk about carpooling for Theresa's party,' or 'Let's check in about what I can bring,'" she explains. "This not only informs the person you are texting as to the topic of conversation, but allows them to respond back in a way they feel most comfortable, whether it is a text, email, or phone call."

This is just one texting etiquette rule you may be breaking, however. For more ways you could be annoying people with your texts, read on. And for other communication errors to avoid, People Don't Trust You If You Text With This Punctuation Mark, Study Says.

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