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6 things you need to know about how impeachment works

Reuters Logo By By Canice Leung, Reuters of Reuters | Slide 1 of 7: WHAT ARE GROUNDS FOR IMPEACHMENT? The U.S. Constitution says the president can be removed from office by Congress for "treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors." Exactly what that means is unclear. Before he became president in 1974, replacing Republican Richard Nixon who resigned over the Watergate scandal, Gerald Ford said: "An impeachable offense is whatever a majority of the House of Representatives considers it to be at a given moment in history." Frank Bowman, a University of Missouri law professor and author of a forthcoming book on the history of impeachment, said Congress could look beyond criminal laws in defining "high crimes and misdemeanors." Historically, it can encompass corruption and other abuses, including trying to obstruct judicial proceedings. Courtesy The Nixon Library and Museum/Handout via REUTERS

WHAT ARE GROUNDS FOR IMPEACHMENT? The U.S. Constitution says the president can be removed from office by Congress for "treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors." Exactly what that means is unclear. Before he became president in 1974, replacing Republican Richard Nixon who resigned over the Watergate scandal, Gerald Ford said: "An impeachable offense is whatever a majority of the House of Representatives considers it to be at a given moment in history." Frank Bowman, a University of Missouri law professor and author of a forthcoming book on the history of impeachment, said Congress could look beyond criminal laws in defining "high crimes and misdemeanors." Historically, it can encompass corruption and other abuses, including trying to obstruct judicial proceedings. 
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