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Congressional Dems move forward on $2,000 checks after Trump signs COVID relief bill

ABC News logo ABC News 12/29/2020
a person flying a kite in front of a building: The U.S. Capitol is seen past the Washington Monument as the sun sets on Dec. 26, 2020, in Washington, D.C. © Samuel Corum/Getty Images The U.S. Capitol is seen past the Washington Monument as the sun sets on Dec. 26, 2020, in Washington, D.C.

It's unclear why President Donald Trump decided to change course and sign the coronavirus relief and government funding bill after calling it a "disgrace" and demanding the direct payments be increased from $600 to $2,000, but his move Sunday night averted a government shutdown.

MORE: Trump signs COVID-19 relief bill after nearly weeklong delay

Striking a victorious tone on Twitter, the president claimed that the Senate would begin the process of voting on $2,000 checks with his approving the funding bill, but Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in a statement Sunday didn't say if the vote on the increased payment was going to happen.

a man and a woman walking in the grass: President Donald Trump plays golf at the Trump International Golf Club in West Palm Beach, Fla., Dec. 27, 2020. © Marco Bello/Reuters President Donald Trump plays golf at the Trump International Golf Club in West Palm Beach, Fla., Dec. 27, 2020.

The House narrowly approved $2,000 payments in a vote Monday evening. There were 44 Republicans who voted with Democrats and the final vote tally was 275-134, receiving the two-thirds majority it required under the expedited vote.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer quickly put out a statement saying he'd move to pass the legislation on Tuesday.

MORE: President Trump throws wrench into COVID-19 relief by saying he won't sign bill

Video: House Dems urge Trump to sign COVID relief bill (Associated Press)

"Every Senate Democrat is for this much-needed increase in emergency financial relief, which can be approved tomorrow if no Republican blocks it -- there is no good reason for Senate Republicans to stand in the way," he said in the statement. "There's strong support for these $2,000 emergency checks from every corner of the country -- Leader McConnell ought to make sure Senate Republicans do not stand in the way of helping to meet the needs of American workers and families who are crying out for help."

a group of people flying kites in front of a building: The U.S. Capitol is seen past the Washington Monument as the sun sets on Dec. 26, 2020, in Washington, D.C. © Samuel Corum/Getty Images The U.S. Capitol is seen past the Washington Monument as the sun sets on Dec. 26, 2020, in Washington, D.C.

Even though Trump supports the measure, a number of House Republicans voted against the bill and its fate remains uncertain in the GOP-led Senate.

It puts congressional Republicans in a tricky spot to navigate. A vote in favor of increasing direct payments would substantially increase the national debt, but a vote against it would deny needed money for Americans wrecked by the economic fallout of the pandemic.

MORE: 'You can't diddle around': Sanders, despite misgivings, urges Trump to sign coronavirus relief bill

In his statement released Sunday night, Trump also expressed a new demand that he wanted to see spending cuts included in the package. Trump said he would be send a "redlined" version of the bill back to Congress. McConnell's statement on Sunday did not specify if Trump got anything at all in return for his approving the bill.

a group of people standing next to a man in a suit and tie: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell walks to his office at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., Dec. 21, 2020. © Bloomberg via Getty Images, FILE Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell walks to his office at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., Dec. 21, 2020.

"I applaud President Trump's decision to get hundreds of billions of dollars of crucial COVID-19 relief out the door and into the hands of American families as quickly as possible," McConnell said in his statement.

ABC News' Mariam Khan and Trish Turner contributed to this report.

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