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Donald Trump's Ex-AG Bill Barr Calls President's Conduct During Capitol Mob a 'Betrayal'

Newsweek logo Newsweek 1/7/2021 Alexandra Hutzler
a man wearing a suit and tie: Former U.S. Attorney General William Barr arrives in the Rose Garden before President Donald Trump introduces 7th U.S. Circuit Court Judge Amy Coney Barrett, 48, as his nominee to the court at the White House on September 26, 2020, in Washington, D.C. Barr issued a statement to the Associated Press on Thursday calling Trump's behavior while his supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol a "betrayal." © Chip Somodevilla/Getty Former U.S. Attorney General William Barr arrives in the Rose Garden before President Donald Trump introduces 7th U.S. Circuit Court Judge Amy Coney Barrett, 48, as his nominee to the court at the White House on September 26, 2020, in Washington, D.C. Barr issued a statement to the Associated Press on Thursday calling Trump's behavior while his supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol a "betrayal."

Former Attorney General William Barr took aim at his former boss following the violence in Washington D.C., calling President Donald Trump's conduct a "betrayal of his office and supporters" in a statement to the Associated Press.

Barr, who left his post as chief of the Departement of Justice on December 23, added in his statement Thursday that "orchestrating a mob to pressure Congress is inexcusable."

Thousands of Trump supporters gathered in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday to protest the outcome of the presidential election. The violent demonstration took place with a joint session of the House and Senate to cement President-elect Joe Biden's Electoral College victory.

A riot broke out as people clashed with federal police and breached the U.S. Capitol building. The area was forced into lockdown as National Guard troops from the District of Columbia and nearby states were mobilized to help control the situation. Four people died during the invasion.

Trump appeared before the rally crowd for more than an hour before the assault on the Capitol took place. The president used the address to continue spreading unsubstantiated allegations of widespread voter fraud, telling his supporters: "We will never give up, we will never concede. You don't concede when there's theft involved."

Later, in a video posted to Twitter, Trump downplayed the violent protest and repeated his fraudulent claim that the election was stolen while also encouraging his supporters to "go home." The clip was removed by Facebook and Twitter, and the president was temporarily suspended from both platforms, as well as from Instagram. On Thursday, Facebook announced Trump's suspension is now indefinite, and will last at least until the end of his presidency on January 20.

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Barr resigned last month after he clashed with Trump over the 2020 election. The former attorney general declared on November 30 that the U.S. Justice Department uncovered no evidence of widespread fraud that could change the outcome of the race.

This is a developing story and will be updated with more information as it becomes available.

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