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Full List of 15 Republican Senators Who Voted to Avoid a Government Shutdown

Newsweek logo Newsweek 10/1/2021 Ewan Palmer
Sunrise hits the U.S. Capitol dome on September 30, 2021 in Washington, DC. as Congress faced a partial federal government shutdown at midnight if the House and Senate did not pass an extension of the current budget. © Provided by Newsweek Sunrise hits the U.S. Capitol dome on September 30, 2021 in Washington, DC. as Congress faced a partial federal government shutdown at midnight if the House and Senate did not pass an extension of the current budget.

Congress has voted to avoid a government shutdown just hours before funding would have lapsed, after both the House and Senate approved a short-term appropriations bill.

The bill, which has now been signed by President Joe Biden, will now keep the government running until December 3.

Every Democratic and independent senator, and 15 Republican senators supported the bill in the 65-35 vote.

All those who voted against funding the legislation, which will provide $28.6 billion in disaster aid for regions struck by extreme weather and money for the resettlement of Afghan refugees, were GOP senators.

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The House later approved the bill in a 254-175 vote, as 34 Republicans also sided with the Democrats.

Full list of 15 Republican Senators who voted against government shutdown

  • Roy Blunt — Missouri
  • Richard Burr — North Carolina
  • Shelley Moore Capito — West Virginia
  • Bill Cassidy — Louisiana
  • Susan Collins — Maine
  • John Cornyn — Texas
  • Lindsey Graham — South Carolina
  • John Kennedy — Louisiana
  • Mitch McConnell — Kentucky
  • Lisa Murkowski — Alaska
  • Mitt Romney — Utah
  • Mike Rounds — South Dakota
  • Richard Shelby — Alabama
  • Thom Tillis — North Carolina
  • Todd Young — Indiana

Ahead of the vote, Graham urged his Republican counterparts to put rivalries aside and vote to pass the new legislation and avoid a shutdown.

"Partisan politics has got to give way to the common good," Graham said after a meeting about the need for infrastructure in the Charleston, South Carolina, area, reported The State.

"Eventually, Republicans and Democrats have got to figure out, whether you like each other or not, you're still stuck in traffic together."

Shelby also praised the Senate for avoiding a government shutdown and helping those affected by extreme weather across the country.

"This effort did not need to be complicated. There was a simple solution negotiated on a bipartisan, bicameral basis, and that's what we advanced today—a bill that continues government funding and provides much-needed emergency and disaster assistance," Shelby said.

"It's time we work together to provide this funding for the sake of the American people."

In a statement, Kennedy said the disaster relief which would be provided to Louisiana and the extension of the National Flood Insurance Program without raising the debt limit were the main reasons for voting to pass the short-term funding bill.

"If you even glance at the storm damage levied on Louisiana over the last year, you know our people need disaster relief. I'm thankful the Senate did the right thing by voting to send aid to our state, extend the flood insurance program Louisianians depend on and keep the government open," said Kennedy.

After signing the legislation into law, Biden said that "there's so much more to do" but the passing of this bill "reminds us that bipartisan work is possible and it gives us time to pass longer-term funding to keep our government running and delivering for the American people."

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