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Herschel Walker Wants to Strip Disenchanted Americans of Citizenship

Newsweek 11/28/2022 Nick Mordowanec
Herschel Walker, Republican candidate for U.S. Senate, speaks at a campaign event on November 6, 2022 in Hiram, Georgia. A resurfaced clip of Walker criticizing younger people and saying citizenship should be revoked for those who disagree with U.S. policy comes days before an extremely close runoff election with Democrat Raphael Warnock. © Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images Herschel Walker, Republican candidate for U.S. Senate, speaks at a campaign event on November 6, 2022 in Hiram, Georgia. A resurfaced clip of Walker criticizing younger people and saying citizenship should be revoked for those who disagree with U.S. policy comes days before an extremely close runoff election with Democrat Raphael Warnock.

Republican Senate candidate Herschel Walker said individuals born after 1990 haven't "earned the right" to change America and should have their citizenship revoked if they think better countries exist.

Walker, who is facing off against Democratic incumbent Senator Raphael Warnock in a December 6 runoff election, originally made the comments in an April 10 interview with journalist Christine Dolan of CD (Creative Destruction) Media.

The clip resurfaced Sunday after being posted by the Twitter account Patriot Takes.

Dolan asked Walker how he felt about "people who want to change America from when you and I were kids," saying that up to 90 million Americans were born after 1990.

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Millennials and Generation Z compose 21.75 percent and 20.67 percent of the U.S. population, respectively, according to 2021 data from Statista. Millennials are designated as those born between 1981 and 1996, and Gen Z are those born between 1997 and 2012.

Millennials now outnumber baby boomers, who represent 21.16 percent of Americans.

"They don't know that the grass is not greener on the other side," Walker responded. "They think there's somewhere better, and if they know another place that's better than the United States of America, my thing is, why don't you go there or tell me, let me know who that is, because I can tell them right now, there's not."

He then said "that most of the people today hadn't earned the right to change America," invoking those who have devoted their lives to military service to protect American liberties.

"And I'm saying, and I'm not being tough, I'm saying if you know a place better, you go there but you lose your citizenship here in the United States of America," Walker continued. "And then when you come back, you gotta come back legally, like we should be defending the border."

Walker's own ties to the U.S. military have been scrutinized.

In 2021, Walker told a Savannah news outlet that he "started a military program" called Patriot Support.

The Associated Press later reported that corporate documents, court records and Senate disclosures showed that Walker was the spokesman of a for-profit program alleged to have preyed upon veterans and service members while defrauding the government.

The AP also reported that Walker was not the individual who initially started the program.

"So let me get this straight—you are demonizing Herschel for being the face of an organization for 14 years that has helped tens of thousands of soldiers suffering from mental illness," Walker spokeswoman Mallory Blount responded to the AP.

Following a remark with Black media outlet Rolling Out that he was "fortunate" in his military career, CNN reported that Walker never served in the military.

While Walker had visited multiple military bases and discussed mental health advocacy, he never was actually part of the military or had a "career" within it.

Data published Monday by the Georgia Secretary of State showed that turnout so far, including both absentee ballots and early voting, has totaled about 181,700. That is about 2.7 percent of the state's 7.006 million active voters.

Of that 181,700, voters aged 18-24 represented some 18,000 voters.

The runoff is due to neither candidate reaching 50 percent of total statewide votes in the November 8 election.

Newsweek reached out to the Walker and Warnock campaigns for comment.

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