You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Jan. 6 Committee Focuses on Trump’s Election Fraud Claims

U.S. News & World Report logo U.S. News & World Report 6/13/2022 Kaia Hubbard
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 09: Former Attorney General William Barr is seen on a screen during a hearing held by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 9, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. The bipartisan committee, which has been gathering evidence related to the January 6 attack at the U.S. Capitol for almost a year, will present its findings in a series of televised hearings. On January 6, 2021, supporters of President Donald Trump attacked the U.S. Capitol Building during an attempt to disrupt a congressional vote to confirm the electoral college win for Joe Biden. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) © (Drew Angerer/Getty Images) WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 09: Former Attorney General William Barr is seen on a screen during a hearing held by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 9, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. The bipartisan committee, which has been gathering evidence related to the January 6 attack at the U.S. Capitol for almost a year, will present its findings in a series of televised hearings. On January 6, 2021, supporters of President Donald Trump attacked the U.S. Capitol Building during an attempt to disrupt a congressional vote to confirm the electoral college win for Joe Biden. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

The congressional committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol outlined on Monday how the “big lie” propagated by former President Donald Trump that the election had been stolen from him paved the way for the riots, while revealing how Trump preemptively planted the seed that the vote was rigged and later ignored attempts from his advisers to persuade him that claims of election fraud were baseless.

“This morning, we’ll tell the story of how Donald Trump lost an election and knew he lost an election and, as a result of his loss, decided to wage an attack on our democracy,” said Committee Chairman Bennie Thompson, Mississippi Democrat. “And in doing so, lit the fuse that led to the horrific violence of Jan. 6.”

But some of the most notable remarks came in videotaped snippets from former Attorney General William Barr, who told the committee that Trump argued for election fraud “right out of the box on election night,” explaining that Trump “claimed that there was major fraud underway … before there was actually any potential of looking at evidence.”

Barr’s remarks, bolstered by footage of Trump during presidential debates ahead of the election claiming that it had already begun to be rigged, added to the argument that seemed to be at the center of Monday’s hearing: that Trump claimed the election was rigged or stolen before one could feasibly determine whether voter fraud existed.


Video: Trump campaign's fake elector scheme under increasing scrutiny by federal investigators (NBC News)

UP NEXT
UP NEXT

Moreover, the hearing seemed to portray Barr as one of the only officials in the Trump administration to oppose the former president, despite a handful testifying that they understood the voter fraud claims were false.

Vice Chairwoman Liz Cheney, Wyoming Republican, noted in her opening remarks that Trump ignored the advice of his campaign advisers, instead following the guidance of an "inebriated" Rudy Giuliani to claim that Trump had won and insist that the vote counting stop immediately.

By December, Barr said he feared Trump had become “detached from reality” if the former president truly believed his claims of voter fraud that he continued to peddle.

“There was never an indication of interest in what the actual facts were,” Barr said. “My opinion then and my opinion now is that the election was not stolen by fraud. And I haven’t seen anything since the election that changes my mind on that.”

The developments come after the Jan. 6 committee kicked off its month-long series of hearings on Thursday during prime, where a video notably showed Barr describing a conversation with the former president during which he told Trump that claims of election fraud were “bull–”

Trump lashed out at Barr on his social media platform Friday morning, saying he was a “weak and frightened Attorney General” who was being “played” by the Democrats, framing his unwillingness to refute what Trump called a “rigged and stolen” election as an effort to avoid impeachment.

Copyright 2022 U.S. News & World Report

AdChoices
AdChoices

More from U.S. News & World Report

U.S. News & World Report
U.S. News & World Report
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon