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Lawmakers celebrate 100th anniversary of women getting the right to vote

The Hill logo The Hill 5/21/2019 Jessica Campisi
a group of people posing for a photo: Lawmakers celebrate 100th anniversary of women getting the right to vote © The Hill Lawmakers celebrate 100th anniversary of women getting the right to vote

House lawmakers took to social media on Tuesday to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the lower chamber passing the 19th Amendment, which guaranteed women's right to vote.

Several lawmakers posted pictures of themselves wearing yellow roses in honor of the anniversary, tweeting photos alongside the hashtag "WomensVote100."

"On this day 100 years ago, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a constitutional amendment granting women the right to vote," Rep. Donna Shalala (D-Fla.) tweeted Tuesday. "May we honor the suffragettes that came before us and continue to fight for the full equality of women & girls everywhere."

"Today, 100 years later, I wear a yellow rose in honor of all American women - without their voices, our nation would not be where it is today," Rep. Chuck Fleischmann (R-Tenn.) wrote on Twitter.

"100 years ago, women fought for and won the right to vote. Today, more than 100 women, led by the remarkable @SpeakerPelosi, serve in the U.S. House of Representatives. I am so proud to be one of them! #WomensVote100" Rep. Frederica Wilson (D-Fla.) tweeted.

Several other House members, including Reps. Brenda Lawrence (D-Mich.), Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-Wash.), Katie Hill (D-Calif.), Steve Cohen (D-Tenn.), Antonio Delgado (D-N.Y.) and Ted Lieu (D-Calif.) also tweeted their support of the anniversary.

Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-Md.) tweeted that the historic vote signaled taking "a step toward becoming a more fair society."

The fight for the right to vote was known as the War of the Roses, during which anti-suffragists wore red roses to signify their opposition and suffragists chose to adopt the yellow rose as the symbol for their cause. The right for women to vote became law in 1920.

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