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Omar fires back at Pence for saying she 'doesn't know what she's talking about'

The Hill logo The Hill 5/4/2019 Morgan Gstalter
Jan Schakowsky, Ilhan Omar are posing for a picture: Omar fires back at Pence for saying she 'doesn't know what she's talking about' © The Hill Omar fires back at Pence for saying she 'doesn't know what she's talking about' Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.) fired back on Friday after Vice President Pence said she "doesn't know what she's talking about" regarding the ongoing conflict in Venezuela.

Omar took to Twitter to say that Pence's criticism is something "women of color have heard" before.

"Instead of 'we disagree,' it's 'she doesn't know what she's talking about,' " Omar wrote. "They have to make us feel small."

"This from an Administration that thinks climate change is a Chinese hoax," she added.

Omar was responding to the vice president's remarks after she warned against U.S. military involvement in Venezuela amid political turmoil in the country.

When asked by Fox News anchor Sandra Smith why he has chosen to criticize Omar on social media, Pence said it was "because the congresswoman doesn't know what she's talking about."

"Nicolás Maduro is a socialist dictator who has taken what was once one of the most prosperous nations in this hemisphere and brought it literally to a level of deprivation and oppression and poverty that we have never seen," Pence said of the Venezuelan leader. "That's not a result of U.S. policies."

The freshman Democrat has been critical of the Trump administration's efforts to pressure Maduro out of office and previously said that the U.S. "helped lead the devastation" in the South American country.

Omar said the economic turmoil in Venezuela has been exacerbated in recent years by U.S.-led sanctions that have cost the economy millions from lost oil revenue.

"A lot of the policies that we have put in place has kind of helped lead the devastation in Venezuela," Omar told Democracy Now this week, adding that U.S. sanctions had "set the stage" for the current humanitarian crisis.

The Trump administration announced support for National Assembly leader Juan Guaidó in January, recognizing him as the country's interim president over Maduro.

Supporters of Guaidó have taken to the streets in recent days in an effort to overthrow Maduro's government in a political rebellion.


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