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Scott has nearly $240,000 to spend in final days of Baltimore mayoral campaign

Baltimore Sun logoBaltimore Sun 10/28/2020 Talia Richman, The Baltimore Sun
Kirk Baskerville, election program assistant, opened mail-in ballots in June as canvassing began during the primary at the Baltimore City Board of Elections warehouse. © Kim Hairston/The Baltimore Sun/TNS Kirk Baskerville, election program assistant, opened mail-in ballots in June as canvassing began during the primary at the Baltimore City Board of Elections warehouse.

City Council President Brandon Scott, the Democratic nominee for mayor, has nearly $240,000 left to spend in the final days of the general election.

Scott is the heavy favorite in deep-blue Baltimore, but he’s going up against an unusually well-funded independent candidate, Bob Wallace.

As of 5 p.m. Friday, Wallace’s campaign had not yet filed an updated financial disclosure form.

But Wallace’s most recent filing, from Aug. 25, showed him with roughly $360,000 cash on hand. His campaign’s bank account was buoyed by $343,000 in loans from him and his wife.

a person standing in a parking lot: Lois Hybl, a volunteer with Everyone Votes, dropped off her ballot in June during the primary at Northwood Elementary School. © Jerry Jackson/The Baltimore Sun/TNS Lois Hybl, a volunteer with Everyone Votes, dropped off her ballot in June during the primary at Northwood Elementary School.

Republican nominee Shannon Wright also had not yet filed an updated form Friday evening, but the previous disclosure showed her with less than $10,000 to spend at that time.

Much of Scott’s recent spending — roughly $100,000 — has been for television ads.

He continues to draw financial support from unions, several of which endorsed him in the June primary. A political action committee associated with the bricklayers union, for example, maxed out its contributions for the year with a new $2,000 donation.

Among the notable people who gave to Scott: Elizabeth Embry, an attorney who ran for mayor in 2016, donated $300; P.J. Hogan, the vice chair of the Maryland elections board, gave $500, and Carl Stokes, a former City Councilman and unsuccessful City Council president candidate, also contributed $500. The federal committees supporting congressmen Steny Hoyer and Jamie Raskin of Maryland together gave $3,000. All are Democrats.

Six executives with Exelon — of which Baltimore Gas & Electric is a subsidiary — contributed a total of $4,100 to Scott’s campaign. The BGE PAC gave an additional $1,500.

Scott received $6,000 maximum donations from only three donors: Zed Smith, chief operating officer of The Cordish Cos.; law firm Gallagher, Evelius & Jones; and Rikert Terminals Corp.

Philadelphia-based political power broker and prolific Democratic fundraiser Kenneth Jarin contributed $500 to Scott, while his law firm Ballard Spahr, which has a Baltimore office, gave $3,000. Pennsylvania-based Pennrose Properties, a development firm specializing in subsidized housing and a frequent political donor, gave Scott $5,000.

Early voting begins Monday, and Election Day is Nov. 3.

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©2020 The Baltimore Sun

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