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Sen. Kevin Cramer suffered ‘serious’ yardwork injury that could result in finger amputation

New York Daily News logo New York Daily News 6/23/2022 Jessica Schladebeck
Sen Kevin Cramer, R-ND, speaks during a Senate Environment and Public Works Committee oversight hearing, May 20, 2020 on Capitol Hill in Washington. He recently revealed he may need surgery amputating part of his finger. © Kevin Dietsch Sen Kevin Cramer, R-ND, speaks during a Senate Environment and Public Works Committee oversight hearing, May 20, 2020 on Capitol Hill in Washington. He recently revealed he may need surgery amputating part of his finger.

GOP Sen. Kevin Cramer suffered a “serious” yardwork injury he said could result in the amputation of part of a finger on his right hand.

The North Dakota Politician in a tweet on Wednesday explained that the incident occurred over the weekend and “required immediate surgery.” It’s not clear what exactly unfolded or how he was hurt.

“I continue to remain in North Dakota close to medical care as there is a high risk of infection and the possible need for amputation,” Cramer said. “I am alert and in good spirits.”

The injury knocked Cramer out of commission for Tuesday’s procedural vote advancing gun safety legislation. He said he plans to return to work sometime after July 4, which means he will miss the remaining days of votes and hearings as the Senate works to advance a bipartisan gun safety package. The landmark legislation, which could pass as soon as by the end of the week, is lawmakers’ response to the mass shootings in Uvalde Tex. and New York.


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On May 24, 18-year-old gunman Salvador Ramos entered Robb Elementary School and then barricaded himself inside a classroom, where he shot and killed a pair of teachers and 19 students. Just 10 days earlier, 10 people, all of them Black, were killed in a shooting inside Tops Friendly Markets store in Buffalo.

Cramer has not voiced his support for the bill, which includes “red flag laws” that make it easier to temporarily confiscate firearms from people dubbed dangerous.

“If we’re not going to pass a federal red flag law, and we shouldn’t, why would we incentivize states to do something that we think is a bad idea?” the senator said last week.

Cramer, 61, has served in the Senate since 2019.

With News Wire Services

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