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Televangelist Pat Robertson no longer thinks Trump can win re-election: 'It's time to move on'

USA TODAY logo USA TODAY 12/22/2020 Joshua Bote, USA TODAY
Pat Robertson wearing a suit and tie sitting in a chair: FILE - In this Friday, Oct. 23, 2015 file photo, Rev. Pat Robertson poses a question to a Republican presidential candidate during a forum at Regent University in Virginia Beach, Va. The Christian Broadcasting Network, which Robertson founded, says he was rushed to the nearest stroke center Friday, Feb. 2, 2018 after a family member recognized the onset of stroke symptoms, and the 87-year-old Robertson is alert and expected to make a full recovery. (AP Photo/Steve Helber) ORG XMIT: NY121 © Steve Helber, AP FILE - In this Friday, Oct. 23, 2015 file photo, Rev. Pat Robertson poses a question to a Republican presidential candidate during a forum at Regent University in Virginia Beach, Va. The Christian Broadcasting Network, which Robertson founded, says he was rushed to the nearest stroke center Friday, Feb. 2, 2018 after a family member recognized the onset of stroke symptoms, and the 87-year-old Robertson is alert and expected to make a full recovery. (AP Photo/Steve Helber) ORG XMIT: NY121

Televangelist Pat Robertson now thinks any effort to re-elect President Donald Trump is futile.

On a Monday broadcast of his long-running Christian series “The 700 Club,” Robertson told viewers that the president "still lives in an alternate reality" — and offered his strongest broadside yet to a man who he's ardently supported for years.

"I think it's all over. I think the Electoral College has spoken," Robertson said. "And I don't think the Biden corruption has not totally been brought to fruition. It doesn’t seem to be affecting the Electoral College, and I don’t think the Supreme Court is gonna move to do anything.”

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It’s a different tune than the one he’s sang in previous weeks and months, where he decreed, “without question, Trump is going to win the election.”

Despite not possessing sufficient evidence of so-called election fraud and warnings from key Republicans such as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Trump and his allies have doubled down on efforts to de-legitimize President-elect Joe Biden's 2020 election win, which was affirmed by an Electoral College vote earlier this month. 

On Monday, Trump met with Republican allies in Congress to discuss the possibility of challenging battleground states' votes on Jan. 6, when members of Congress are required to count electoral votes.  

Robertson, the right-wing founder of the Christian Broadcasting Network, has only recently criticized the president, calling him out for his response to unrest over the death of George Floyd earlier this year.

The remainder of the segment was an assessment of Trump's four years in office. Despite the president's ability "to raise money, draw large crowds," as well as his loyalty to evangelical Christians, his feelings about the president are decidedly mixed.

“The President still lives in an alternate reality," he said. "He doesn’t lie. To him, that’s the truth.”

Robertson went on to list some of Trump's common falsehoods, specifically about his inauguration and the success of “The Apprentice.”

“He’s done a marvelous job for the economy, but at the same time, he’s very erratic — he’s fired people, he’s fought people, he’s insulted people. It’s a mixed bag. It would be well to say ‘you’ve had your day, and it’s time to move on.’"

Also tucked into his rant was a peculiar prediction about the incoming administration.

“I think we’re going to see a President Biden, and I also think we’ll be seeing a President Kamala Harris not too long after the inauguration of President Biden.”

Contributing: The Associated Press. Follow Joshua Bote on Twitter: @joshua_bote.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Televangelist Pat Robertson no longer thinks Trump can win re-election: 'It's time to move on'

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