You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Trump’s tax returns have been turned over to Manhattan district attorney

The Washington Post logo The Washington Post 2/25/2021 Shayna Jacobs
a man wearing a suit and tie: Former president Donald Trump had fought in court for more than a year to shield disclosure of his tax records. © Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post Former president Donald Trump had fought in court for more than a year to shield disclosure of his tax records.

NEW YORK —The Manhattan District Attorney's Office has taken possession of former president Donald Trump's tax returns and a wealth of other financial data deemed central to prosecutors' ongoing criminal case, officials confirmed Thursday.

The transfer, involving millions of pages of records, occurred Monday after the U.S. Supreme Court rejected the former president’s last-ditch bid to shield his information from the district attorney, Cyrus R. Vance Jr. (D).

In a statement, a spokesman for Vance’s office, Danny Frost, confirmed that Trump’s longtime accounting firm, Mazars, had complied with the subpoena after 18 months of delay while the former president’s lawyers waged an exhaustive legal battle. The transfer occurred within hours of the Supreme Court’s one-line order, Frost said.

A spokesman for Trump’s accounting firm said Thursday that, “As we have maintained throughout this process, Mazars will comply with all its legal and professional obligations.”

[Supreme Court ends Trump’s bid to shield his tax returns and effort to challenge election losses]

A team of analysts in the district attorney’s office, including some from an outside forensics accounting firm, FTI Consulting, have been at the ready for months to dissect the records and scour for any evidence of criminal activity at the Trump Organization or by its executive employees. That group includes Trump, three of his adult children — Donald Trump Jr., Eric Trump and Ivanka Trump — and Allen Weisselberg, the company’s longtime chief financial officer.

Vance’s investigators are evaluating whether the values of property assets in the Trump Organization portfolio were manipulated to gain tax advantages or favorable loans and insurance rates under false pretenses. The records are voluminous, dating back eight years, and the district attorney’s examination could take months.


Video: Trump Has to Turn Over Tax Returns to Manhattan DA (QuickTake)

[Manhattan prosecutor hires forensic accounting experts as Trump criminal probe escalates] Cyrus Vance, Jr. wearing a suit and tie: Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance Jr. responds to a question during a news conference in New York. © Frank Franklin II/AP Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance Jr. responds to a question during a news conference in New York.

Trump has rigorously and at times angrily denied any wrongdoing, labeling the district attorney’s investigation a “fishing expedition” and part of a broader political ploy orchestrated by Democrats.

Trump’s lawyers had sought to block the records’ release to Vance by asking the Supreme Court to issue an order pausing proceedings while his legal team mounted an appeal challenging the subpoena’s legality. Such an appeal has not been filed. His attorneys initially argued that Trump was immune to a state-level investigation while he was in office, but the Supreme Court rejected that claim in July.

Trump faces unprecedented legal jeopardy for a former president.

Vance’s investigation is one of two known criminal probes involving him. The other was opened this month in Atlanta, where the Fulton County district attorney is investigating Trump’s controversial conversations with Georgia state officials amid his failed bid to overturn the election results there.

The New York state attorney general is conducting a separate investigation into the Trump Organization’s business and real estate activities.

The former president also faces defamation lawsuits brought separately by two women who have accused him of sexual assault. His niece Mary L. Trump is suing him and his siblings over an inheritance dispute.

He’s also being sued by the former tenants of apartments his family once owned, and by people who say they saw little to no profit after joining a multilevel marketing organization touted by Trump and his children.

David A. Fahrenthold in Washington contributed to this report.

AdChoices
AdChoices

More from The Washington Post

The Washington Post
The Washington Post
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon