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Trump Shouldn't Run in 2024 So 'Younger People' Win: Ex-Trump Official

Newsweek logo Newsweek 8/16/2022 Nick Mordowanec
Donald Trump's former Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney said in an interview that the GOP should focus on "younger people" to run for president in 2024. Trump is pictured speaking at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) at the Hilton Anatole on August 06, 2022 in Dallas, Texas. © Brandon Bell/Getty Images Donald Trump's former Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney said in an interview that the GOP should focus on "younger people" to run for president in 2024. Trump is pictured speaking at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) at the Hilton Anatole on August 06, 2022 in Dallas, Texas.

Former White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney was blunt about his feelings about having his former boss, ex-President Donald Trump, run for president again in 2024.

Trump, who is weighing but has not formally declared a presidential campaign, is embroiled in controversy surrounding last week's FBI raid of his Mar-a-Lago residence in Palm Beach, Florida. He's accused of improperly possessing classified documents.

While Trump has used what he called an "attack on democracy" to boost a voter base that has largely galvanized around him, others, including Mulvaney, are using it to push the GOP to move on from Trump, who is 76.

"The Democrats are weak, and I don't think we should be offering Donald Trump for that reason," Mulvaney told NewsNation on Monday. "I think it's also time for the next generation to take over, anyway. We've got a good bench, we've got younger people. It's time for Donald Trump to go to the sideline, continue to push the policies that made him so popular."

Among the GOP candidates Mulvaney floated for 2024 were Florida Governor Ron DeSantis, Senator Tim Scott of South Carolina, former Vice President Mike Pence, former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and former South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley.

A poll released Tuesday shows DeSantis virtually tied with Trump among Florida Republican voters, with the governor actually possessing a two-point lead that further raises speculation about his own presidential goals. DeSantis has said he's focused on reelection efforts in the 2022 Florida gubernatorial race.

Mulvaney's comments about youth and a new face of the party are echoed in polling, including a YouGov poll from June in which a majority of Republicans and Democrats wanted candidates other than Trump and President Joe Biden, who is 79.

Mulvaney has been critical of the former president since resigning in March of 2020 and has broken with Trump on the January 6 Capitol riot. He's even gone as far as praising Republican Congresswoman Liz Cheney, one of Trump's fiercest GOP critics.

"The same reasons I quit the job are the same reasons I would be very slow to vote for Donald Trump," Mulvaney told NewsNation. "I don't think we need him. I'm hoping that somebody else runs against him in the primary because I think we can have the same policies without all the baggage."

Even with Trump's potential legal challenges, his popularity in the party has arguably not been higher since he was president.

A Morning Consult/Politico poll following the FBI raid showed that nearly three in five Republicans would vote for him again in 2024. His 58 percent support exceeds his 54 percent and 53 percent the Real Clear Politics average of recent national surveys in July and June, respectively, amid response to the ongoing January 6 hearings.

Polls also have showed that Trump is ahead of Biden in a hypothetical rematch of the 2020 election. The raid has also been used by Trump to drum up support for the midterm elections, using his social media platform Truth Social to say, "Republicans could win many additional seats, both in the House & Senate, because of the strong backlash over the raid at [Mar]-a-Lago."

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