You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Potential hurricane causes NASA to delay Artemis 1 mission for the third time

Washington Examiner logo Washington Examiner 9/24/2022 Jenny Goldsberry

NASA's latest mission to the moon, Artemis 1, has been delayed for the third time.

The administration announced Saturday that a hurricane is likely to interfere with its planned Tuesday launch from its Kennedy Space Center in Florida. By Monday, Tropical Storm Ian will have become a hurricane, and it is expected to hit Florida's coast by Thursday, according to the National Weather Service.

Officials with NASA will decide Sunday whether the storm will be significant enough to call for Artemis 1's 322-foot rocket to be taken off the launch pad and into a hangar.

SEE IT: BRIDGESTONE REINVENTS TIRE FOR NASA'S MOON MISSION

The NASA moon rocket stands on Pad 39B before the Artemis 1 mission to orbit the moon at the Kennedy Space Center, Friday, Sept. 2, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson) © Provided by Washington Examiner The NASA moon rocket stands on Pad 39B before the Artemis 1 mission to orbit the moon at the Kennedy Space Center, Friday, Sept. 2, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

Ian is expected to bring heavy rainfall, hurricane winds, flash flooding, and mudslides across Jamaica, Cuba, and Florida. Hurricane season tends to begin in June and fade out at the end of November.

"While it is too soon to determine the exact magnitude of these hazards, residents in Cuba, the Florida Keys, and the Florida peninsula should ensure they have their hurricane plan in place, follow any advice given by local officials, and closely monitor updates to the forecast," the NWS wrote in its Saturday advisory.

A liquid hydrogen leak led to the rocket's second rescheduled launch, which was a problem during the rocket's first launch as well.

Artemis I is supposed to be "the first flight test of the integrated Orion spacecraft and the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket," according to NASA's website, and the rocket "will fly 40,000 miles beyond the Moon and back, demonstrating our capability to send humans to lunar orbit on the second flight test."

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

The last day Artemis could launch is Oct. 2 before its two-week blackout period, which is meant to make way for the SpaceX launch, the fifth crewed mission to the International Space Station scheduled for Oct. 5.

 

Washington Examiner Videos

Tags: NASA, News, Space, Weather, Science and Technology

Original Author: Jenny Goldsberry

Original Location: Potential hurricane causes NASA to delay Artemis 1 mission for the third time

AdChoices
AdChoices

More from Washington Examiner

Washington Examiner
Washington Examiner
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon