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COVID-19 LIVE UPDATES: Missouri reports 2,801 deaths since start of outbreak

KMBC Kansas City logo KMBC Kansas City 10/25/2020
a red and white sign: CORONAVIRUS LIVE UPDATES © Provided by KMBC Kansas City CORONAVIRUS LIVE UPDATES

Kansas City metro area health officials are grappling with how to handle continuing case count increases after reopening businesses more than two months ago.

What you need to know:

  • The Kansas Department of Health and Environment said Friday the state has 76,230 confirmed cases of COVID-19, and there have been 975 deaths since the outbreak started. Kansas is now only updating COVID-19 data on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
  • The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services said Saturday that there have been 167,452 cases of COVID-19 since the start of the outbreak and 2,801 deaths.
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SATURDAY

3:50 p.m. -- The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services reported 2,918 new cases of COVID-19 on Saturday, bringing the statewide total to 167,452 since the start of the outbreak.

There have now been 2,801 deaths across Missouri from COVID-19, which is up 113 from Friday's reporting. The DHSS said that number is not always indicative of deaths that occurred in the past 24 hours. This is based on when information was received and/or entered in the system.

[ MISSOURI COVID-19 DASHBOARD]

Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.

The state said it has tested a total of 2,388,281, and 110, 179 were tested in the past seven days. There have been 10,881 positive cases and 75 deaths in the last week.

Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 14,117 (+128) confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 9,765 (+103) cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 2,477 total cases in Clay County, 1,993 in Cass County and 964 in Platte County.

FRIDAY

6 p.m. -- With the number of coronavirus patients requiring hospitalization rising at alarming levels, Missouri and perhaps a handful of other states are unable to post accurate data on COVID-19 dashboards because of a flaw in the federal reporting system.

Since Tuesday, the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Service’s coronavirus dashboard has posted a message that the total number of patients hospitalized for COVID-19 has been underreported since Oct. 17. READ MORE.

3:30 p.m. -- The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services announced Friday that there will be additional free COVID-19 testing at various sites in Missouri in a regular, weekly pattern.

These new testing sites are part of national surge testing efforts, and will temporarily increase federal support to areas in Missouri where there have been recent increased levels of new cases and hospitalizations related to the ongoing outbreak.

Testing sites:

  • Lee's Summit/Jackson County, Thursdays and Fridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., (beginning Oct. 29) 616 NE Douglas, Lee's Summit
  • Columbia, Mondays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., (beginning Oct. 26) Memorial Baptist Church, 1634 Paris Road
  • Branson, Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., (beginning Oct. 27) Cox Health, 121 Cahill Rd
  • St. Louis City, Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. (beginning Nov. 3) Affinia Healthcare, 3930 S. Broadway
  • Cape Girardeau, Thursdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., (beginning Oct. 29) Arena Park, 410 Kiwanis Drive

2:15 p.m. -- The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services reported 1,811 new cases of COVID-19 on Friday, bringing the statewide total to 164,534 since the start of the outbreak.

There have now been 2,688 deaths across Missouri from COVID-19. The DHSS said that number is not always indicative of deaths that occurred in the past 24 hours. This is based on when information was received and/or entered in the system.

[ MISSOURI COVID-19 DASHBOARD]

Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.

Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 13,989 (+85) confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 9,662 (+121) cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 2,449 total cases in Clay County, 1,967 in Cass County and 956 in Platte County.

12:30 p.m. -- The Kansas Department of Health and Environment reported an increase of 1,774 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in its first update since Wednesday, pushing the statewide total to 76,230 since the outbreak started.

KDHE officials said Friday the death total grew by 23 to 975. State health officials said the spike can be attributed to a reconciliation of death certificates.

The average median age of the deaths is 80, which is steady from Wednesday’s reporting.

Health officials said Friday that 3,584 (+78) patients have been hospitalized since the start of the outbreak, 1,001 (+26) were admitted to the ICU, 309 (+11) required mechanical ventilation and 2,518 (+33) patients have been discharged. The state also said it has 36% (-1%) of its ICU beds available and 80% (-2%) of its ventilators available.

The state said it has tested 616,262 people with 540,032 negative test results with an overall monthly positive test rate of 8.1%.

[ KANSAS COVID-19 COVID-19 DASHBOARD ]

Johnson County continues to have the most confirmed cases in Kansas with 14,148. Sedgwick County is the county with the second most cases with 11,550. Wyandotte County is third with 8,216 cases.

Leavenworth County – home to Lansing Correctional Facility – has 2,582 cases, and Douglas County now reports 2,662. The Douglas County case count is largely tied to increases at the University of Kansas.

Health officials said the median age of people with COVID-19 is 37, and they are monitoring 235 (+0) active outbreak clusters with 86 clusters reported in long-term care facilities.

10 a.m. -- Johnson County reported Friday morning 13,420 (+117) cases of COVID-19 since the outbreak started, 1,428 cases in the last 14 days and 237 cases per 100,000 people in the county over the last 14 days.

The county said it has 10,785 (+115) presumed recoveries, 190 (+5) people have died, and 536 (+4) people have been hospitalized since the start of the outbreak.

Johnson County said it has tested 146,479 people with 133,059 tests coming back negative.

As of Friday, the school reopening gating criteria – the 14-day rolling total used by the county to make recommendations on how schools should reopen – remained in the orange phase and the percent positivity moving average is at 6.8%.

The county said it is monitoring 16 outbreaks at senior living care facilities. It also said that 122 (+3) people from senior living care facilities have died, which is 64.2% of the deaths in Johnson County.

8 a.m. -- Wyandotte County is reporting Friday morning 7,921 (+31) confirmed cases of COVID-19 since the outbreak started, with 41 patients currently hospitalized and 236 (+9) probable cases. The county said 161 (+0) people have died from the coronavirus since the start of the outbreak.

The county’s COVID-19 report indicates which ZIP codes have the most recent cases. Over a 14-day period, the 66106 ZIP code had 117 cases, followed by 66102 with 102, 66104 with 82 and 66109 with 67.

Wyandotte County does not list hospital capacity numbers on its dashboard.

7 a.m. -- The state of Kansas isn’t officially listing the number of people who have recovered from COVID-19, but local health departments across the state are keeping track.

According to numbers from Friday morning, there have been 59,155 people who have recovered from the coronavirus.

This includes 10,670 in Johnson County, 6,542 in Wyandotte County, 2,243 in Leavenworth County and 2,489 in Douglas County.

6 a.m. -- Kansas’ coronavirus case count continued to climb, even as one GOP lawmaker pushed back against Democratic Gov. Laura Kelly’s call for a statewide mask mandate.

“I’ve stated all along, and still believe, a one-size-fits-all COVID solution doesn’t work for our diverse state,” Kansas Senate President Susan Wagle, a Wichita Republican, said Thursday in a written statement. “Local leaders have done a great job in dictating local responses after public hearings and discussions with their constituents.”

More than 90 of the state’s 105 counties have opted out of the current mask order. That's why Kelly said Wednesday that she plans to speak with House and Senate leadership to work toward a bipartisan mask requirement with more teeth.

Her announcement came as the seven-day rolling average of the positivity rate in Kansas rose from 15.04% on Oct. 7 to 20.64% on Wednesday, according to data from The COVID Tracking Project. The seven-day average for new cases also set another record of 757 on Wednesday. And from Monday to Wednesday, the state also added 80 more COVID-19-related deaths, most of them stemming from a review of death certificates, bringing the state’s fatality toll to 952.

“Yes, Kansas has been experiencing an increase in cases recently, specifically in the rural parts of our state," said Kristi Zears, a spokeswoman for the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, in an email. “It’s more important now than ever to wear masks, continue to practice social distancing, stay home when sick and avoid large groups of people."

But many lawmakers are resistant to imposing statewide restrictions, wanting the decisions left to local officials. Kelly said during a news conference that there would be legislative challenges but that the research was clear: masks work.

“People don’t have time for us to wait around for an election to be over with,” Kelly said. “We need to start these conversations. We need to come to a resolution as soon as we can. We know we have a problem, and that’s why we need a solution.”

Even in Wichita, the state's largest city, restrictions have been weakened. An ordinance there requiring protective face masks was quietly allowed to expire by the City Council this week. That means control over masks now shifts to Sedgwick County. The county commission has twice rejected mask orders from Kelly, though orders from county health officer have been allowed to stay in place.

But police cannot write tickets for violations of the county’s public health order, as they could under the city’s stronger ordinance. The county version can only be enforced through the lengthy procedure of filing a civil lawsuit and obtaining a court order, The Wichita Eagle reports.

[ CLICK HERE FOR MAPS OF COVID-19 CASES BY COUNTY IN KANSAS & MISSOURI ]

[ TRACKING COVID-19 CURVE OF CASES, DEATHS IN KANSAS & MISSOURI ]

THURSDAY6:55 p.m. -- The Clinton School District said Thursday that it has received confirmation of two positive COVID-19 cases. The buildings affected are Clinton Intermediate School and Clinton Technical School.

2:05 p.m. -- The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services reported 1,854 new cases of COVID-19 on Thursday, bringing the statewide total to 162,723 since the start of the outbreak.

There have now been 2,657 deaths across Missouri from COVID-19, which is up 16 from Wednesday. The DHSS said that number is not always indicative of deaths that occurred in the past 24 hours. This is based on when information was received and/or entered in the system.

[ MISSOURI COVID-19 DASHBOARD]

Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.

The state said it has tested a total of 2,346,490, and 107,801 were tested in the past seven days. There have been 10,655 positive cases and 68 deaths in the last week.

Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 13,904 (+35) confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 9,541 (+157) cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 2,412 total cases in Clay County, 1,940 in Cass County and 945 in Platte County.

1:17 p.m. -- Kansas' coronavirus positivity rate has climbed above 20%, even as one top GOP lawmaker pushed back against Democratic Gov. Laura Kelly's call for a statewide mask mandate to curb the spread of COVID-19.

“I’ve stated all along, and still believe, a one-size-fits-all COVID solution doesn’t work for our diverse state,” Kansas Senate President Susan Wagle, a Wichita Republican, said Thursday in a written statement. “Local leaders have done a great job in dictating local responses after public hearings and discussions with their constituents.”

More than 90 of the state’s 105 counties have opted out of the current mask order. That's why Kelly said Wednesday that she plans to speak with House and Senate leadership to work toward a bipartisan mask requirement with more teeth.

Her announcement came as the seven-day rolling average of the positivity rate in Kansas rose from 15.04% on Oct. 7 to 20.64% on Wednesday, according to data from The COVID Tracking Project. Only three states fared worse. The seven-day average for new cases also set another record of 757 on Wednesday, with many of the new cases coming from rural parts of the state.

Earlier this month, the state’s top public health official, Dr. Lee Norman, blamed the state’s worsening numbers on residents’ refusal to consistently follow public health guidelines for mask-wearing, social distancing and avoiding large public gatherings.

But many lawmakers are resistant to imposing statewide restrictions, wanting the decisions left to local officials. Kelly said during a news conference that there would be legislative challenges but that the research was clear: masks work.

“People don’t have time for us to wait around for an election to be over with,” Kelly said. “We need to start these conversations. We need to come to a resolution as soon as we can. We know we have a problem, and that’s why we need a solution.”

Even in Wichita, the state's largest city, restrictions have been weakened. An ordinance there requiring protective face masks was quietly allowed to expire by the City Council this week. That means control over masks now shifts to Sedgwick County. The county commission has twice rejected mask orders from Kelly, though orders from county health officer have been allowed to stay in place.

But police cannot write tickets for violations of the county’s public health order, as they could under the city’s stronger ordinance. The county version can only be enforced through the lengthy procedure of filing a civil lawsuit and obtaining a court order, The Wichita Eagle reports.

11:45 a.m. -- The University of Kansas City Athletics has announced an eight-month suspension of the golf, cross country and track and field programs, effective Nov. 1. The University said all student-athletes impacted will retain their scholarships and have the ability, if desired, to transfer. READ MORE

8 a.m. -- Wyandotte County is reporting Thursday morning 7,921 (+67) confirmed cases of COVID-19 since the outbreak started, with 41 patients currently hospitalized and 227 (+1) probable cases. The county said 161 (+3) people have died from the coronavirus since the start of the outbreak.

The county’s COVID-19 report indicates which ZIP codes have the most recent cases. Over a 14-day period, the 66106 ZIP code had 122 cases, followed by 66102 with 100, 66104 with 85 and 66109 with 72.

Wyandotte County does not list hospital capacity numbers on its dashboard.

7:30 a.m. -- Johnson County reported Thursday morning 13,303 (+80) cases of COVID-19 since the outbreak started, 1,428 cases in the last 14 days and 237 cases per 100,000 people in the county over the last 14 days.

The county said it has 10,670 (+142) presumed recoveries, 185 (+2) people have died, and 532 (+4) people have been hospitalized since the start of the outbreak.

Johnson County said it has tested 145,693 people with 132,390 tests coming back negative.

As of Thursday, the school reopening gating criteria – the 14-day rolling total used by the county to make recommendations on how schools should reopen – remained in the orange phase and the percent positivity moving average is at 6.9%.

The county said it is monitoring 16 outbreaks at senior living care facilities. It also said that 119 people from senior living care facilities have died, which is 65% of the deaths in Johnson County.

7 a.m. -- The state of Kansas isn’t officially listing the number of people who have recovered from COVID-19, but local health departments across the state are keeping track.

According to numbers from Thursday morning, there have been 58,843 people who have recovered from the coronavirus.

This includes 10,528 in Johnson County, 6,542 in Wyandotte County, 2,243 in Leavenworth County and 2,452 in Douglas County.

6 a.m. -- Health care workers will be the first to receive a coronavirus vaccine when one is approved for use and becomes available in Missouri, according to the state's draft plan submitted to federal authorities. The 111-page plan details how Missouri would distribute the vaccine to millions of state residents and discusses possible roadblocks to what would be one of the largest and quickest distribution efforts in history. READ MORE

5:30 a.m. -- Missouri Gov. Mike Parson on Wednesday called lawmakers back to work for a special session to give his administration the authority to dole out additional federal coronavirus aid funding. Parson said the session is necessary to allow the state to hand out federal money for school food programs, job training, homelessness prevention, domestic violence grants and child support payments. READ MORE

[ CLICK HERE FOR MAPS OF COVID-19 CASES BY COUNTY IN KANSAS & MISSOURI ]

[ TRACKING COVID-19 CURVE OF CASES, DEATHS IN KANSAS & MISSOURI ]

WEDNESDAY

8:45 p.m. -- RideKC said Wednesday that it has confirmed a positive COVID-19 test result for a bus driver in October. READ MORE.

4:40 p.m. -- Missouri Gov. Mike Parson announced a special session on a supplemental budget bill beginning Nov. 5.

Since the General Assembly passed the FY 2021 budget in May, additional federal funding has been made available to the state, including funding under the CARES Act. The supplemental budget will provide access to this funding, which is intended to appropriate additional resources to respond to COVID-19.

4:15 p.m. -- Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly said she will talk with House and Senate leaders about a new mask mandate for Kansans.

Kelly also announced financial relief for people facing eviction. The Kansas Eviction Prevention Program received $35 million of CARES Act money. It means tenants behind on rent can apply up to $5,000 and up to 9 months of rent. Landlords can also apply.

the money will be distributed first come, first served basis until the money runs out.

To apply, visit KSHousingCorp.org.

2:45 p.m. -- The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art said Wednesday it is cutting 36 jobs because of the pandemic. The museum closed to visitors, except for essential staff on March 14 and reopened on Sept. 12. Officials said the museum lost revenue from event rentals, fundraisers, ticketing, the Rozzelle Court Restaurant, parking fees and sale of merchandise during that time. READ MORE.

2:05 p.m. -- The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services reported 1,244 new cases of COVID-19 on Wednesday, bringing the statewide total to 160,869 since the start of the outbreak.

There have now been 2,641 deaths across Missouri from COVID-19, which is up 26 from Tuesday. The DHSS said that number is not always indicative of deaths that occurred in the past 24 hours. This is based on when information was received and/or entered in the system.

[ MISSOURI COVID-19 DASHBOARD]

Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.

The state said it has tested a total of 2,326,868, and 113,173 were tested in the past seven days. There have been 11,185 positive cases and 63 deaths in the last week.

Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 13,869 (+77) confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 9,384 (+74) cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 2,347 total cases in Clay County, 1,929 in Cass County and 926 in Platte County.

1:15 p.m. -- The Kansas Department of Health and Environment has amended its travel quarantine list to include those who have traveled to North Dakota and the country of Andorra beginning Wednesday. The KDHE said it evaluates the previous two weeks' case rates by 100,000 population for states and countries, and locations with significantly higher rates – approximately 3x higher than Kansas – are added to the list. READ MORE

12:30 p.m. -- The Kansas Department of Health and Environment reported an increase of 1,448 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in its first update since Monday, pushing the statewide total to 74,456 since the outbreak started.

KDHE officials said Wednesday the death total grew by 80 to 952. State health officials said the spike can be attributed to a reconciliation of death certificates.

The average median age of the deaths is 80, which is up one year from Monday’s reporting.

Health officials said Wednesday that 3,506 (+85) patients have been hospitalized since the start of the outbreak, 975 (+23) were admitted to the ICU, 299 (+5) required mechanical ventilation and 2,485 (+70) patients have been discharged. The state also said it has 37% (-6%) of its ICU beds available and 82% (+0%) of its ventilators available.

The state said it has tested 605,509 people with 531,053 negative test results with an overall monthly positive test rate of 7.9%.

[ KANSAS COVID-19 COVID-19 DASHBOARD ]

Johnson County continues to have the most confirmed cases in Kansas with 13,906. Sedgwick County is the county with the second most cases with 11,185. Wyandotte County is third with 8,147 cases.

Leavenworth County – home to Lansing Correctional Facility – has 2,561 cases, and Douglas County now reports 2,632. The Douglas County case count is largely tied to increases at the University of Kansas.

Health officials said the median age of people with COVID-19 is 36, and they are monitoring 235 (-6) active outbreak clusters with 86 clusters reported in long-term care facilities.

The state also updated its locations of active COVID-19 clusters.

Johnson County has seven clusters at long-term care facilities:

Brookdale in Overland Park

Brookdale Rosehill in Shawnee

Garden Terrace at Overland Park

Infinity Park Post Acute and Rehab in Overland Park

Lakeview Village Long Term Care in Overland Park

Shawnee Post Acute and Rehabilitation Center in Overland Park

Wyandotte County has one active cluster at The Piper Assisted Living and Memory Care in Kansas City, Kansas.

11 a.m. -- Health care workers and long-term care residents will be among those who will get the coronavirus vaccine first in Kansas, a draft plan shows. Kansas’ 45-page plan was filed in the past week with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. READ MORE

8 a.m. -- Wyandotte County is reporting Wednesday morning 7,854 confirmed cases of COVID-19 since the outbreak started, with 41 patients currently hospitalized and 226 probable cases. The county said 158 people have died from the coronavirus since the start of the outbreak.

The county’s COVID-19 report indicates which ZIP codes have the most recent cases. Over a 14-day period, the 66106 ZIP code had 112 cases, followed by 66102 with 92, 66104 with 86 and 66109 with 68.

Wyandotte County does not list hospital capacity numbers on its dashboard.

7:30 a.m. -- Johnson County reported Wednesday morning 13,223 (+226) cases of COVID-19 since the outbreak started, 1,480 cases in the last 14 days and 246 cases per 100,000 people in the county over the last 14 days.

The county said it has 10,528 (+263) presumed recoveries, 183 (+10) people have died, and 528 (+11) people have been hospitalized since the start of the outbreak.

Johnson County said it has tested 145,100 people with 131,877 tests coming back negative.

As of Wednesday, the school reopening gating criteria – the 14-day rolling total used by the county to make recommendations on how schools should reopen – remained in the orange phase and the percent positivity moving average is at 6.8%.

The county said it is monitoring 16 outbreaks at senior living care facilities. It also said that 119 (+8) people from senior living care facilities have died, which is 65% of the deaths in Johnson County.

7 a.m. -- The state of Kansas isn’t officially listing the number of people who have recovered from COVID-19, but local health departments across the state are keeping track.

According to numbers from Wednesday morning, there have been 57,847 people who have recovered from the coronavirus.

This includes 10,390 in Johnson County, 6,542 in Wyandotte County, 2,224 in Leavenworth County and 2,441 in Douglas County.

6 a.m. -- A Kansas man who prosecutors say threatened to kidnap and kill Wichita's mayor because he was upset with the city's mask ordinance was charged Tuesday with three counts of criminal threat.

Meredith Dowty, 59, of Wichita, is accused of sending text messages to a city employee threatening to kill Mayor Brandon Whipple because of his role in the passage of a mask mandate to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

Dowty's bond was set at $50,000 and his next court date was set for Nov. 5.

“He said he was going to kidnap me and slash my throat and he needed my address because I needed to see the hangman,” Whipple said Saturday after the threats were revealed.

On Monday, Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly said the anger over restrictions imposed to protect public health was getting out of hand.

“It’s imperative that we turn down the rhetoric — the anti-science, anti-mask rhetoric,” Kelly said. “We see what’s going on, what it has done here with the mayor of Wichita and elsewhere such as Michigan.”

Members of a self-appointed militia group are facing charges accusing them of plotting to kidnap Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer. The FBI and Michigan law enforcement have charged 14 men in connection with a domestic terrorism plot.

The state health department reported Monday that Kansas had 2,113 new confirmed and probable coronavirus cases since Friday, an increase of 3% that brought the total number of infections reported in the state to 72,968. The department also reported 13 additional COVID-19-related deaths, bringing the Kansas death toll to 872.

Meanwhile, the coronavirus claimed the life of a sixth Kansas inmate Monday. The inmate, who was serving a life sentence for four sex crime convictions from Wyandotte County, was housed at the Ellsworth Correctional Facility. He is among about 2,500 inmates and more than 300 prison workers statewide to be infected.

The Kansas Department of Corrections said in a news release that the inmate's family has asked that his name not be released. He was 60 and had underlying medical conditions.

[ CLICK HERE FOR MAPS OF COVID-19 CASES BY COUNTY IN KANSAS & MISSOURI ]

[ TRACKING COVID-19 CURVE OF CASES, DEATHS IN KANSAS & MISSOURI ]

TUESDAY

9:30 p.m. -- More students in the Lee's Summit School District will return to classrooms full time. Students in fourth grade through sixth grade will transition from hybrid learning to in-person learning starting Nov. 16. Families who chose the virtual-only option are not affected.

District leaders made the change after learning schools in Jackson County have not had many instances of significant virus spread when people wear masks.

2:20 p.m. -- The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services reported 1,524 new cases of COVID-19 on Tuesday, bringing the statewide total to 159,625 since the start of the outbreak.

There have now been 2,615 deaths across Missouri from COVID-19, which is up 25 from Monday. The DHSS said that number is not always indicative of deaths that occurred in the past 24 hours. This is based on when information was received and/or entered in the system.

[ MISSOURI COVID-19 DASHBOARD]

Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.

The state said it has tested a total of 2,314,846, and 111,207 were tested in the past seven days. There have been 11,142 positive cases and 64 deaths in the last week.

Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 13,792 (+59) confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 9,310 (+114) cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 2,323 total cases in Clay County, 1,909 in Cass County and 921 in Platte County.

12:15 p.m. -- The National Football League and NFL Players Association announced the COVID-19 monitoring testing results for Oct. 11-Oct. 17.

During this period, players and Tier 1 and 2 personnel were tested daily. Tier 3 individuals were tested weekly. Individuals who test positive for COVID-19 follow the joint NFL-NFLPA Treatment Protocol. They are immediately isolated, not permitted access club facilities, or have direct contact with players or personnel. Club medical staff are in regular communication with individuals who test positive to monitor symptoms.

Monitoring Testing results for Oct. 11-Oct. 17:

  • 38,880 tests were administered to a total of 7,799 players and team personnel.
  • 15,167 tests were administered to 2,459 players; 23,713 tests were administered to 5,340 personnel.
  • There were eight new confirmed positive tests among players and 11 new confirmed positives among other personnel.

Total test results for the entire Monitoring Testing period to-date, Aug 1-Oct 17:

  • During Monitoring Testing from Aug 1 – Oct 17, 47 players and 71 other personnel were confirmed positive cases.
  • More than 450,000 tests were administered to players and personnel during the Aug 1-Oct 17 period.

11:30 a.m. -- Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly says it's time to tone down the “the anti-science, anti-mask rhetoric,” after a retired firefighter who was upset about Wichita’s mask ordinance was arrested on suspicion of threatening to kidnap and kill the city's mayor.

Police have said the man could face a charge of criminal threat in relation to a series of text messages sent to a city official that appeared to threaten the life of Wichita Mayor Brandon Whipple.

The Wichita Eagle reports that prosecutors said the man, who was arrested Friday, could be arraigned as early as Tuesday afternoon.

11 a.m. -- A leading coronavirus expert in St. Louis is warning that hospital workers are “over-worked and demoralized” after months of battling the coronavirus, and the worst may be yet to come.

Dr. Alex Garza of the St. Louis Metropolitan Pandemic Task Force said hospitalizations are getting higher and intensive care unit beds are filling up at a time when the flu season is about to create even more strain on the health care system.

The St. Louis region is actually in better shape than the rest of the state, according to data released Tuesday on the state health department’s COVID-19 dashboard. Hospitalizations are at or near record levels in virtually every region except St. Louis, which was hit hardest in the spring. But, according to Garza, even St. Louis is seeing an uptick.

“Our cases, our hospitalizations, and our admissions numbers all continue at a dangerous ascent, into territory we haven’t seen since early on in the pandemic,” Garza said at a briefing Monday. “Unfortunately, we have erased every bit of progress that we’ve made this summer and fall.”

The state on Tuesday reported another 1,524 confirmed cases, bringing the total since the onset of the pandemic to 159,625. The state also reported 25 more deaths. All told, 2,615 people in Missouri have died from COVID-19. Missouri ranks eighth nationally for the most new cases over the past week, and seventh for deaths. The positivity rate of 21.1% for the past seven days is four times higher than the 5% benchmark the state seeks to achieve.

In Springfield, CoxHealth constructed a temporary building on the parking lot of Cox Medical Center South to serve the expected overflow of COVID-19 and flu patients.

The state dashboard showed that ICU capacity statewide was down to 29%, with 476 of Missouri’s 1,439 COVID-19 patients receiving intensive care. The data also shows that 788 ventilators are in use, a figure that includes non-COVID-19 patients.

Garza said the renewed onslaught is taking a toll.

“Our staff are exhausted, they’re over-worked and they’re demoralized, which decreases the quality of care that everyone receives, not just COVID patients,” he said.

Two small towns announced new mask orders. The facial covering requirements in Nixa and Ozark both begin Wednesday. Ozark city leaders cited the rise in confirmed COVID-19 cases in Christian County and the increasing number of hospitalizations, KYKY-TV reported.

Rick Groves, the assistant police chief in the small Missouri Bootheel town of Kennett, died Friday, a month after contracting COVID-19 “while serving in his capacity as a law enforcement officer,” according to a news release from Gov. Mike Parson’s office.

Parson ordered U.S. and Missouri flags at government buildings in Dunklin County to fly at half-staff Tuesday in honor of Groves, who was with the Kennett department for 35 years.

8:45 a.m. -- An Ellsworth Correctional Facility resident who died Monday had tested positive for COVID-19, the Kansas Department of Corrections said. This is the sixth resident death related to COVID-19. The resident tested positive on Sept. 26. At that time, he was moved to the Lansing Correctional Facility COVID-19 Management Unit. Three days later he was transported from LCF to the hospital.

The resident’s family has asked that his name not be released. He was a 60-year-old black male with underlying medical concerns that contributed to his condition.

The resident was serving a life sentence based on four sex crime convictions from Wyandotte County, Kansas.

7:30 a.m. -- Johnson County reported Tuesday morning 12,997 (+62) cases of COVID-19 since the outbreak started, 1,414 cases in the last 14 days and 235 cases per 100,000 people in the county over the last 14 days. The county said it has 10,265 (+74) presumed recoveries, 173 (+0) people have died, and 511 (+0) people have been hospitalized since the start of the outbreak.

Johnson County said it has tested 143,235 people with 130,238 tests coming back negative.

As of Tuesday, the school reopening gating criteria – the 14-day rolling total used by the county to make recommendations on how schools should reopen – remained in the orange phase and the percent positivity moving average is at 6.6%.

The county said it is monitoring 19 outbreaks at senior living care facilities. It also said that 111 people from senior living care facilities have died, which is 64.1% of the deaths in Johnson County.

7 a.m. -- The state of Kansas isn’t officially listing the number of people who have recovered from COVID-19, but local health departments across the state are keeping track.

According to numbers from Tuesday morning, there have been 55,867 people who have recovered from the coronavirus.

This includes 10,265 in Johnson County, 6,066 in Wyandotte County, 2,224 in Leavenworth County and 2,374 in Douglas County.

6 a.m. -- A coronavirus outbreak has killed 10 residents in a nursing home in a northwestern Kansas county that proportionally already had the nation's largest increase in cases over two weeks.

The health department in Norton County reported Monday night that all 62 residents and an unspecified number of employees at the Andbe Home in Norton had tested positive for the novel coronavirus. The agency also said one Andbe Home resident was hospitalized, while the remaining 51 were being treated at the home.

“Steps are being taken to prevent any further outbreak, including quarantining residents in their rooms and not allowing outside visitors into the facility,” the county health department said in a statement Monday evening.

The outbreak at the nursing home came after the state Department of Health and Environment last week reported more than 100 cases at the state's prison in Norton over the two weeks ending Wednesday.

Kansas is seeing an average of more than 700 new confirmed and probable coronavirus cases a day, its largest numbers since the pandemic reached the state in early March.

But northwestern Kansas has been hit hard by coronavirus in recent weeks, and Norton County had the largest number of new cases per 100,000 residents of any county in the U.S. for the two weeks ending Sunday, according to data collected by Johns Hopkins University.

The Kansas health department said that cases in Norton County rose from 46 two weeks ago to 340 as of Monday in Norton County. With about 5,400 residents, that was an increase of 5,484 cases per 100,000 residents, according to the state’s figures.

But the state released its report before Norton County officials confirmed that all Andbe Home residents had tested positive for coronavirus and before local officials reported 10 deaths at the home.

The 15 counties in the state’s northwest corner together had 987 new coronavirus cases during the past two weeks, an increase of nearly 49%, to bring the total to 3,024, according to state health department data. With 80,000 people living in the region, the increase was 1,226 cases for every 100,000 residents, more than three times the state’s figure.

Two other northwest Kansas counties, Sheridan and Gove, also were among the top 20 counties in the nation for the largest proportional increases in cases for the two weeks ending Sunday, based on Johns Hopkins data.

The state health department reported Monday that Kansas had 2,113 new confirmed and probable coronavirus cases since Friday, an increase of 3% that brought the pandemic total to 72,968. The department also reported 13 additional COVID-19-related deaths, bringing the total to 872 before the nursing home deaths in Norton were reported.

Kansas had an average of 729 new cases a day for the seven days ending Monday after first exceeding 700 cases a day for the seven days ending Oct. 12. The record is 743 cases for the seven days ending Wednesday.

The state on Monday also reported its first COVID-19-related staff death at one of its four hospitals for the mentally ill or the developmentally disabled.

The Department for Aging and Disability Services, which oversees the hospitals, said an employee at the state's mental hospital in Larned in southwestern Kansas died last week but said the staffer had not been on hospital grounds for several weeks. The department did not identify the staffer.

In Olathe in the Kansas City area, a middle school classroom assistant died from COVID-19-related complications, KCTV reported. Mission Trail Middle School's principal said in an email to parents that the staffer had been sick for several weeks and had not been in the building since Sept. 24.

Meanwhile, Gov. Laura Kelly and Wichita State University officials celebrated the opening of a new laboratory that can run 32,000 coronavirus testing specimens a week. Kansas has averaged about 29,000 tests a week over the past month, according to data from the state health department.

Kelly said the high-capacity lab will help the state identify coronavirus hot spots so that its residents can avoid them.

"We can help provide certainty that our schools and our businesses can stay open safely,” Kelly said in a statement.

[ CLICK HERE FOR MAPS OF COVID-19 CASES BY COUNTY IN KANSAS & MISSOURI ]

[ TRACKING COVID-19 CURVE OF CASES, DEATHS IN KANSAS & MISSOURI ]

MONDAY

10:15 p.m. -- The Raytown school board voted Monday to keep middle and high school students in virtual learning through the end of the semester. The district said it will spend the next few weeks creating a plan to bring those students back to school in some way starting in January. Elementary school students return to in-person learning on Monday.

8:50 p.m. -- A coronavirus outbreak has killed 10 residents in a nursing home in a northwestern Kansas county that proportionally already had the nation's largest increase in cases over two weeks. READ MORE.

3:15 p.m. -- The Park Hill School District said a woman with close ties to student athletes in the district has passed away from COVID-19 complications. READ MORE.

2:45 p.m. -- Olathe Public Schools said Monday that a paraprofessional at Mission Trail Middle School died over the weekend from COVID-19. READ MORE.

2:40 p.m. -- The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services reported 1,405 new cases of COVID-19 on Monday, bringing the statewide total to 158,101 since the start of the outbreak.

There have now been 2,590 deaths across Missouri from COVID-19, which is up eight from Sunday. The DHSS said that number is not always indicative of deaths that occurred in the past 24 hours. This is based on when information was received and/or entered in the system.

[ MISSOURI COVID-19 DASHBOARD]

Missouri does not list how many people have recovered from COVID-19.

The state said it has tested a total of 2,296,674, and 105,986 were tested in the past seven days. There have been 10,768 positive cases and 56 deaths in the last week.

Looking at local numbers, the DHSS reported 13,733 (+119) confirmed cases in Kansas City, Missouri, and 9,196 (+22) cases in Jackson County. The state also lists 2,300 total cases in Clay County, 1,883 in Cass County and 909 in Platte County.

1:30 p.m. -- Kansas Secretary of State Scott Schwab reiterated on Monday that masks are not required to vote in the Nov. 3 general election. “As Kansas voters begin to cast their ballots for the 2020 election, our priority is to ensure every Kansan has the opportunity to exercise their right to vote,” Schwab said in a news release on Monday. “Kansas voters who choose to vote in-person will be allowed to vote, regardless of whether or not they wear a mask.” READ MORE

12:30 p.m.-- The Kansas Department of Health and Environment reported an increase of 2,113 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in its first update since Friday, pushing the statewide total to 72,968 since the outbreak started.

KDHE officials said Monday the death total grew by 13 to 872.

The average median age of the deaths is 79, which is steady from Friday’s reporting.

Health officials said Monday that 3,421 (+51) patients have been hospitalized since the start of the outbreak, 952(+19) were admitted to the ICU, 294 (+10) required mechanical ventilation and 2,415 (+36) patients have been discharged. The state also said it has 43% (+8%) of its ICU beds available and 82% (-3%) of its ventilators available.

The state said it has tested 598,934 people with 525,426 negative test results with an overall monthly positive test rate of 7.9%.

[ KANSAS COVID-19 COVID-19 DASHBOARD ]

Johnson County continues to have the most confirmed cases in Kansas with 13,702. Sedgwick County is the county with the second most cases with 10,927. Wyandotte County is third with 8,039 cases.

Leavenworth County – home to Lansing Correctional Facility – has 2,534 cases, and Douglas County now reports 2,602. The Douglas County case count is largely tied to increases at the University of Kansas.

Health officials said the median age of people with COVID-19 is 36, and they are monitoring 241 (+0) active outbreak clusters with 88 clusters reported in long-term care facilities.

9 am.-- A Raymore-Peculiar Elementary School teacher has tested positive for COVID-19, the school district announced on Sunday. The district said the Cass County Health Department and school district administrators have conducted contact tracing and notified individuals who were potentially exposed and need to quarantine related to this case .

8:30 a.m. -- Tom Pelissero of the NFL Network reported that Monday’s Kansas City Chiefs and Buffalo Bills game will go on as scheduled. Pelissero said his sources have told him that there were no new positive COVD-19 tests among players, team personnel, officials and gameday assistants. The Chiefs face the Bills in Buffalo at 4 p.m. READ MORE

7:30 a.m. -- Johnson County reported Monday morning 12,935 cases of COVID-19 since the outbreak started, 1,385 cases in the last 14 days and 230 cases per 100,000 people in the county over the last 14 days. The county said it has 10,191 presumed recoveries, 173 people have died, and 511 people have been hospitalized since the start of the outbreak.

Johnson County said it has tested 142,781 people with 129,846 tests coming back negative.

As of Monday, the school reopening gating criteria – the 14-day rolling total used by the county to make recommendations on how schools should reopen – remained in the orange phase and the percent positivity moving average is at 6.5%.

The county said it is monitoring 19 outbreaks at senior living care facilities. It also said that 111 people from senior living care facilities have died, which is 64.1% of the deaths in Johnson County.

7 a.m. -- The state of Kansas isn’t officially listing the number of people who have recovered from COVID-19, but local health departments across the state are keeping track.

According to numbers from Monday morning, there have been 55,242 people who have recovered from the coronavirus.

This includes 10,191 in Johnson County, 6,066 in Wyandotte County, 2,178 in Leavenworth County and 2,364 in Douglas County.

6:30 a.m. --Missouri continued to report record numbers of coronavirus cases over the weekend and the rate of positive cases remains high across the state.

On Saturday, the state reported a record 2,357 new cases of COVID-19, according to its online virus tracker. Sunday's increase of 1,768 cases was smaller but still substantial. The state now has 156,696 cases of the virus and 2,582 deaths since the pandemic began.

The state said the positivity rate for coronavirus tests over the last seven days is 19.7%, and six counties reported rates above 50%. The counties with positivity rates over 50% are Holt, New Madrid, Osage, Stoddard, Dekalb and Moniteau counties. Holt County led the state with a positivity rate of 63.2%.

Gov. Mike Parson has refused to require mask wearing in Missouri, and the state loosened most virus restrictions in mid June.

The state’s rate of new cases per 100,000 residents over the past two weeks registered at 399.55 and ranked tenth-highest among all the states on Saturday, according to an Associated Press analysis of data from Johns Hopkins University.

The seven-day rolling average of daily new cases in Missouri has risen over the past two weeks from 1,298.71 new cases per day on Oct. 3 to 1,528.29 new cases per day on Saturday.

[ CLICK HERE FOR MAPS OF COVID-19 CASES BY COUNTY IN KANSAS & MISSOURI ]

[ TRACKING COVID-19 CURVE OF CASES, DEATHS IN KANSAS & MISSOURI ]

The Associated Press contributed to this story.

READ THE FULL STORY:COVID-19 LIVE UPDATES: Missouri reports 2,801 deaths since start of outbreak

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