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Daywatch: The Michael Madigan case has a familiar lesson for Illinois politics | How small towns are attracting remote workers | Chicago celebrates 185 years as a city

Chicago Tribune logo Chicago Tribune 3/4/2022 Chicago Tribune staff, Chicago Tribune
Nancy Gerth, 3, a fourth generation Chicagoan, lights candles on the city's birthday cake with an assist from John Lundgren, left, of the Garfield Park Conservatory, and William Q. Pirie, also a fourth generation Chicagoan on March 4, 1966, at Carson Pirie Scott and Co. Atop the cake is a "Chicago Azalea," plant named in honor of the 129th birthday. © George Quinn/Chicago Tribune/TNS Nancy Gerth, 3, a fourth generation Chicagoan, lights candles on the city's birthday cake with an assist from John Lundgren, left, of the Garfield Park Conservatory, and William Q. Pirie, also a fourth generation Chicagoan on March 4, 1966, at Carson Pirie Scott and Co. Atop the cake is a "Chicago Azalea," plant named in honor of the 129th birthday.

Good morning, Chicago.

The swagger that Illinois’ Democrats have displayed since taking full control of Springfield three years ago had already been tamped down by the political realities of confronting crime and COVID. Michael Madigan’s indictment, the Tribune’s Rick Pearson writes, will add one more campaign issue to the list: corruption.

Cassandra Cole-Williams, a CPD narcotics Sgt. whose team was deployed for seven days to protect her supervisor's house in the Bridgeport neighborhood during looting, June 7, 2021. © E. Jason Wambsgans/Chicago Tribune/TNS Cassandra Cole-Williams, a CPD narcotics Sgt. whose team was deployed for seven days to protect her supervisor's house in the Bridgeport neighborhood during looting, June 7, 2021.

The Tribune’s Ray Long and Jason Meisner put the Madigan case into broader Illinois political context: At its core, the alleged bribery scheme involving the former Speaker and Commonwealth Edison is a familiar lesson on how cozy relationships between business leaders and politicians can catch the attention of federal prosecutors.

Matt Thomas gives Mark Hoyt a shave and a haircut at Gold Line Barbershop on Feb. 16, 2022 in Quincy, Ill. Thomas recently recreated to Quincy from California and opened the barbershop. © Brian Cassella/Chicago Tribune/TNS Matt Thomas gives Mark Hoyt a shave and a haircut at Gold Line Barbershop on Feb. 16, 2022 in Quincy, Ill. Thomas recently recreated to Quincy from California and opened the barbershop.

And if you’re playing catch-up on the Madigan news, here’s what to know.

Here are the top stories you need to know to start your day.

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Ukrainian immigrant watches her homeland’s flag raised atop the Illinois Capitol: ‘It was a lot of sadness ... a lot of pride.’

Days into Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, Tatyana Shlyak couldn’t shake the fear and uncertainty she felt about the future of her homeland. She found a measure of solace and an outlet for her patriotic feelings earlier this week when she was invited to a private flag-raising ceremony beneath the dome of the Illinois state Capitol, where for many years she has been the supervisor of tour guides.

Shlyak had tears in her eyes as she watched the blue and yellow ensign wave and flicker in the strong winds alongside the U.S. and Illinois state flags.


Video: No perp walk for ex-Illiniois House Speaker Mike Madigan (ABC 7 Chicago)

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How small towns like Quincy are attracting remote workers: ‘The sense of community’

Before the pandemic, moving to a different city wasn’t really an option for Marcus Medsker, who was living in a two-bedroom condo in the River North neighborhood of Chicago. But when his wife became pregnant with their second child, they decided to move to his hometown of Quincy, Illinois. The low cost of living and small-town feel has made life with young kids a lot simpler, and he said his proximity to family has been one of the most special parts of being back.

Tatyana Shlyak, who was born in Ukraine and moved to the United States in 1995, is a tour guide at the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield, Illinois, poses for a portrait on March 2, 2022. Shylak participated in the raising of the Ukrainian flag on Monday at the statehouse. © Rich Saal / for the/Chicago Tribune/TNS Tatyana Shlyak, who was born in Ukraine and moved to the United States in 1995, is a tour guide at the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield, Illinois, poses for a portrait on March 2, 2022. Shylak participated in the raising of the Ukrainian flag on Monday at the statehouse.

Many small towns in the Midwest are trying to attract remote workers by using their sense of community to their advantage.

Cop who told Tribune she guarded boss’ block during 2020 civil unrest files suit claiming retaliation

© Chicago Tribune/TNS

Veteran Chicago police narcotics Sgt. Cassandra Williams said the backlash she faced was almost immediate after she told several colleagues that her commanding officer had her and other officers guard his block in the Bridgeport neighborhood during the civil unrest in Chicago in May 2020.

In a civil lawsuit filed earlier this week in U.S. District Court, the 31-year police veteran said she has endured a toxic workplace, being either ignored or openly mocked since she filed a formal complaint with the city inspector general’s office and spoke with the Tribune in June 2021.

9 seafood-focused specials around Chicago to help you get through Lent

You can give up anything from cursing to candy for Lent, but one of the most traditional sacrifices is to abstain from red meat.

Chicago’s large Catholic population means there are plenty of restaurants helping to make the period from Ash Wednesday to Easter a little less painful by offering seafood-focused specials. These fish fries and dinners are so good, you might want to stop in even if you’re not forgoing beef.

Vintage Chicago Tribune: Go CHICAGO, it’s your birthday!!! Go CHICAGO, it’s your birthday!!!

That’s right, our sweet home celebrates 185 years as a city Friday, March 4. Visual reporter Kori Rumore imagines if it were the late 1990s and Chicago were a person, then she imagines its call into WGCI-FM 107.5 to do the infamous “Birthday Song” — something she ALWAYS wanted to do, but was too nervous to attempt.

Rumore explores how Chicago has celebrated its birthday in the past, from that time Pac-Man — and Ms. Pac-Man — attended the city’s 150th anniversary. Chicago’s gifts to the world and more.

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