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Fauci: Don’t Rely on Summer Weather to Curb Coronavirus Pandemic

U.S. News & World Report logo U.S. News & World Report 4/5/2021 Cecelia Smith-Schoenwalder
a group of people walking down the street: LOS ANGELES, CALIF. - MAR. 21, 2021. A crowd of people descends on Venice Beach, with some wearing masks and others not, on Sunday, Mar. 21, 2021, during the first weekend after coronavirus restrictions were eased in Los Angeles County. (Luis Sinco/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images) © (Luis Sinco/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images) LOS ANGELES, CALIF. - MAR. 21, 2021. A crowd of people descends on Venice Beach, with some wearing masks and others not, on Sunday, Mar. 21, 2021, during the first weekend after coronavirus restrictions were eased in Los Angeles County. (Luis Sinco/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

Federal health officials on Monday warned the public against counting on the idea that summer weather will bring a lull in coronavirus transmission.

"I don't think we should even think about relying on the weather to bail us out of anything we're in right now," leading infectious disease expert Anthony Fauci said during a press briefing.

Fauci added that a little over a year ago "we were looking for the summer to rescue us from surges" when the opposite happened.

CDC Director Rochelle Walensky said that there have not been seasonal trends with the virus so far, also noting last summer's surge in transmission.

"Respiratory viruses tend to have seasonal trends, as do coronaviruses specifically, but we haven't yet seen that," she said. "So I think we're going to have to be careful throughout the spring and the summer here."

The U.S. is averaging 3.1 million vaccinations per day. Over the weekend, more than 4 million doses were administered in a single day for the first time.

However, Walensky warned that cases are increasing and that many outbreaks among young people are due to extra curriculars and sport activities, so she warned the public to stay vigilant and follow mitigation measures like mask wearing and social distancing.

She added that the CDC has updated its cleaning and disinfection guidance to reflect that the risk of coronavirus transmission via surfaces is low. She said regularly washing surfaces with soap and water rather than using a chemical disinfectant is typically enough.

"In most situations, regular cleaning of surfaces with soap and detergent – not necessarily disinfecting those surfaces – is enough to reduce the risk of COVID-19 spread," she said. "Disinfection is only recommended in indoor settings, schools and homes where there has been a suspected or confirmed case of COVID-19 within the last 24 hours."

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