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Fort Worth City Council District 2 candidates

Fort Worth Star-Telegram logoFort Worth Star-Telegram 4/13/2021 Luke Ranker, Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Apr. 13—Carlos E. Flores

https://carlosfloresfwd2.com/

Age: 52

Occupation: Aerospace Engineer

Education: BS Aerospace Engineering. Graduate of Leadership FW

What's the best way for voters to reach you? carlosfloresfwd2@gmail.com

Have you run for elected office before? (Please list previous offices sought)

Yes. Ran for City Council D2 Elected in 2017

Please list highlights of your civic involvement (for example, service on boards/commissions or leadership positions held):

Fmr. Northside Neighborhood Assc. President; Fmr. Pres. FW League of Neigbhorhoods; Fmr. Chair FW Zoning Comm; Fmr. Chair FW Building Standards Comm; Fmr. CCPD Board Member; Fmr. Library Foundation Board; Fmr., Animal Advisory Cmte; Fmr. Park Advisory Cmte; Co-Hair of Nuestro Kimbell Art Museum; Co-Chair of 2020 CFW Census Complete Count Cmte; Fmr. City Charter Review Cmte; Fmr. Stockyards Design Stds Task Force; Mayor's Blue Ribbon Infrast/Transport; Capt.Lockheed Cardboard Boat Regatta Team

Have you ever been arrested, charged with a crime or otherwise been part of a criminal proceeding? If yes, please explain:

No

Have you been involved in a civil lawsuit or bankruptcy proceeding? If yes, please explain:

No

Who are your top three campaign contributors?

1) FW Police Officers Association; 2) Good Government Fund; 3) FW Professional Firefighters

Why are you seeking this office?

I am running for re-election to continue to make progress and deliver on plans to address remaining needs in District 2 and the City. I am a servant leader and work / devote myself full-time as council member. To best serve as councilmember, one must know the needs of the communities of a district. Since being elected in 2017, I identified those needs of District 2, ranked them, and am making great progress in address them for the benefit of the residents I represent. I do this for them, for my own family and my beloved hometown.

What are the biggest challenges facing your city/district?

1) Police Relations w/Public; 2) Infrastructure (maintenance/new); 3) Tax Rate; 4) Job Growth; 6) Affordable Housing; 7) Homelessness

What would your top 3 policy priorities be?

1) Police Relations w/Public; 2) Infrastructure; 3) Tax Rate;

Why should voters choose you over your opponent(s)?

Since elected in 2017, I have delivered progress and results. There are needs for the City and District 2 that I am uniquely qualified and able to address in areas of public safety and improving community policing, tax burden, infrastructure, and neighborhood revitalization. Born and raised in FW's Northside, I have the deepest roots of any D2 candidate and the only candidate with the record of community service, public service, ability to creatively problem solve and will continue to deliver results for our District 2 residents. My endorsement reflect my ability to earn confidence in working to find common ground on which to build solutions that benefit my district and city.

COVID-19 has radically changed our country and city. What would have done differently than current leaders to navigate the pandemic?

COVID-19 continues to be an unprecedented event with unforeseen effects. At the local level, County and City response has been more effective as a combined effort. District 2 was the first to launch a pilot COVID-19 testing site through a partnership with Kroger Health & City. It still serves as a testing site now in collaboration with Texas Disaster Emergency Management. Though the pandemic is not over, I can look towards the recent past and see that more outreach, especially to majority minority communities should have been made earlier. The County wasn't able until later to translate its online materials. Some folks did not have internet access or computer access. The city did, however, not hesitate to partner with healthcare agencies like UNT HSC, MedStar, JPS and others including the FW Fire Department to increase our testing capacity and vaccination efforts. There are many counties in North Texas and there was some struggle to get all leadership on the same page when it came to mask orders, social distancing, restaurant and bars, etc. I would have waited longer prior to removing mask mandate, at least until after spring break.

Though Fort Worth is one of the fastest growing cities in the country, a 2018 economic development study noted we risk becoming a bedroom community to Dallas County, where job growth is strong. What should the city do to attract jobs, corporate relocations and other economic development?

To attract jobs and corporate relocations, FW must do / continue to do the following: 1) have affordable single-family homes; 2) work with ISDs to improve public school academic performance; 3) boost growth in startups and tech companies using specific incentives which will attract other companies for sustained growth. As part of incentive packages, encourage companies that relocate to contribute to local non-profits.

Last year the Star-Telegram highlighted disparities in the 76104 ZIP code that led to the area having the worst life expectancy in Texas. The investigation revealed a lack of access to jobs, transportation, groceries and health care. What should the city do to improve circumstances in the area?

Connectivity and access to affordable public transportation through a multi-modal transit system is key. Jobs, services and organizations exist across the city but often times residents in needs of these cannot readily access or get to them. The Northside TEXRail station was the very first commuter rail station to open in the entire city in an area where such needs exist. With connections to neighboring cities and DFW Airport, commuters have gained more access and will continue to do so with future planned connections. Transit Oriented Development is an effective tool for redevelopment. ZipZones encompassing job hubs also provide workers circulation to and from existing public transit nodes. Community healthcare clinics (e.g. JPS, North Texas Area Community Health Clinics) are more prevalent, especially in socio-economically depressed areas and located near transit connections. The city continues it's partnership with Blue Zones Project that promotes healthier lifestyles and eating.

The city's budget will take a hit from COVID-19 in the coming years, particularly in the form of lost sales and tourism revenue. What priorities would be in your city budget?

Impacts to our City budget will be felt more accurately in the next budget process. Our top goals are to 1) Maintain or reduce the property tax rate; 2) Maintain Funding for Capital Investment & Maintenance; 3) New Facilities & Current Obligations; 4) Re-Evaluate Funding Priorities. Our growing city needs to have part of its revenue dedicated to capital and dedicated to debt servicing.

Fort Worth's property taxes are out of balance, with the vast majority of revenue coming from homeowners rather than commercial property taxes. How would you correct this?

Commercial property owners pay 36% while residential property owners pay 64% of the property tax burden. Commercial property owners shift some of their property tax burden to residential property tax payers through manipulation of values. If some rules are changes or amended, this could help reduce that. Part of the solution also involves reversing the trend of the State Legislature reducing funding for public schools. The recent school finance bill added funding but did not go far enough and the burden is shifted to cities and residential taxpayers. As part of our budgetary focus, City Council will either reduce or maintain the property tax rate. Every year that I've been on Council, I have voted for that.

Fort Worth's public transportation lags behind other major cities in Texas both in the scope of the system and the amount of public money spent on transit. Trinity Metro is in the process of redesigning the bus network and has requested additional funding from the city. Do you support boosting the city's allocation to Trinity Metro? How should Fort Worth improve its public transportation?

I am supportive of either examining increasing the City's allocation to Trinity Metro or finding another (supplemental/sustainable) funding source. To improve FW's public transportation system, it must be made multi-modal. Currently, that is not the case; there are separate transit networks: bus, rail, commuter rail, etc. that lack fuller connectivity.

A chief complaint from residents in Fort Worth's suburban neighborhoods are congested arterial streets. Often new subdivisions outpace street capacities. What can be done to improved this?

Arterials infrastructure needs total more than $300M across almost every council district. The City plans to devote funding towards capital improvements in the 2022 Bond Program. Coupled with our partnership with Tarrant County for 50% matching funds, we would be able to share those costs and address more needs. The City's tiered schedule of impact fees distributes the costs of development between the public and private sectors.

The current City Council accepted the Race and Culture Task Force recommendation for a civilian review board for the police department, but the board has not been established. What form do you think this review board should take?

The City Council accepted the Race and Culture Task Force recommendations as a set of which the civilian review board is part. Council did discuss and articulated that once the Office of the Police Monitor was established, the Police Monitor would hold public meetings/forums to collect resident input on police matters including the civilian review board. The Police Monitor would then make a recommendation(s) to Council regarding the establishment of the civilian review board. One idea I have submitted to staff involves installing a CCPD Civilian Advisory Board which could do two things: 1) advise Council on CCPD matters; 2) consider matters pertaining to police conduct. As the only person who has served both a a civilian board member on CCPD and council member, I have unique experience and insight into this approach. Civilian Review boards aren't typically imbued with subpoena power.

There has been an ongoing cry to improve equity in Fort Worth, including a campaign last year to end the special police sales tax and devote that money to transportation or social services. Are there changes you'd like to see to the police department?

The Crime Control and Prevention District (CCPD) was first created to address the urgent needs of rising violent crime and gang violence. It has developed since to include community based programs that provide funding for non-profit groups to address specific issues that prevent crime or programs that steer youth or vulnerable persons away from the effects of criminal activity. Council makes changes to the allocations of the CCPD as the needs arise. Recently, more funding was allocated to: Neighborhood Policing, Gang Intervention, School Resource Officer Program and Community

As Fort Worth grows and diversifies, how should the city's leadership improve equity?

The City, as part of the Race & Culture Task Force recommendations, has already begun efforts to improve equity. The Office of Diversity & Inclusion was established which itself did a top-down assessment of all city departments and gave recommendations to the City Manager & Council. One of those recommendations included the equitable delivery of city services. For example, the Transportation & Public Works Department now uses metrics that quantity and rank infrastructure needs departing from the "squeaky wheel" response. As a member of the Neighborhood Services & Housing Committee, staff assesses those needs in accordance to equity parameters. Equity is an approach to delivery of city services and governance, not a program.

Theodore O Gray

Vote Theodore O'Conor Gray

Age: 47

Occupation: Business Man/ Adjunct Professor

Education: Masters Degree

What's the best way for voters to reach you? 817-909-2280

Have you run for elected office before? (Please list previous offices sought)

No

Please list highlights of your civic involvement (for example, service on boards/commissions or leadership positions held):

Former Vice President Santa Fe Homeowner Association; Member of the World Mission Committee of Episcopal Dioceses of Fort Worth.

Have you ever been arrested, charged with a crime or otherwise been part of a criminal proceeding? If yes, please explain:

No

Have you been involved in a civil lawsuit or bankruptcy proceeding? If yes, please explain:

No

Who are your top three campaign contributors?

Campaign is self funded.

Why are you seeking this office?

I am running because I care about community/district #2 development and stability. I want help improve the following areas: (1) Primary and secondary education in under-privileged communities; (2) Police/community relationship; (3) Property taxes; (4) Public Safety, (5) Infrastructure. My advanced educational background, along with my diversity skills and experiences have helped me to prepared for this opportunity.

What are the biggest challenges facing your city/district?

Public safety, homelessness, and high property taxes.

What would your top 3 policy priorities be?

1. Improving quality education in underprivileged communities 2. Improving police and communities relationships 3 .Affordable property Tax. Additionally, I will support public safety, encourage the continued improvement of the city infrastructure, support marketing efforts of the broadband projects, and encourage new economic development while supporting our local businesses.

Why should voters choose you over your opponent(s)?

I am a high achiever individual with more than ten years of business experience including training and development. My background also comprises of strong motivational and innovative leadership skills.

COVID-19 has radically changed our country and city. What would have done differently than current leaders to navigate the pandemic?

I would created more awareness concerning COVID-19 and follow CDC guidelines tothe fullest extent.

Though Fort Worth is one of the fastest growing cities in the country, a 2018 economic development study noted we risk becoming a bedroom community to Dallas County, where job growth is strong. What should the city do to attract jobs, corporate relocations and other economic development?

Implement tax breaks that attract more business to Fort Worth. Consequently, bringing jobopportunity to the community.

Last year the Star-Telegram highlighted disparities in the 76104 ZIP code that led to the area having the worst life expectancy in Texas. The investigation revealed a lack of access to jobs, transportation, groceries and health care. What should the city do to improve circumstances in the area?

We need to educate our people more so they are aware of these circumstances and provideresources so they are able to improve their lives.

The city's budget will take a hit from COVID-19 in the coming years, particularly in the form of lost sales and tourism revenue. What priorities would be in your city budget?

Healthcare, housing, local small businesses and Creating new job opportunities for the people of Fort Worth.

Fort Worth's property taxes are out of balance, with the vast majority of revenue coming from homeowners rather than commercial property taxes. How would you correct this?

I would look into revamping taxes policies for both commercial and homeowners.

Fort Worth's public transportation lags behind other major cities in Texas both in the scope of the system and the amount of public money spent on transit. Trinity Metro is in the process of redesigning the bus network and has requested additional funding from the city. Do you support boosting the city's allocation to Trinity Metro? How should Fort Worth improve its public transportation?

When I am elected God willing, I will review the details and make the appropriate decisions that will be beneficial to the citizens of Fort Worth.

A chief complaint from residents in Fort Worth's suburban neighborhoods are congested arterial streets. Often new subdivisions outpace street capacities. What can be done to improved this?

I would work with the city manager to some put regulations in place that would increase revenue and increase road construction/infrastructures.

The current City Council accepted the Race and Culture Task Force recommendation for a civilian review board for the police department, but the board has not been established. What form do you think this review board should take?

I would recommend to have a chair, co-chair, four members and a liaison officer.

There has been an ongoing cry to improve equity in Fort Worth, including a campaign last year to end the special police sales tax and devote that money to transportation or social services. Are there changes you'd like to see to the police department?

I would like to see more social services involved in the community and not have all calls responded by police. This way the police will have more resources to attend to criminal issues.

As Fort Worth grows and diversifies, how should the city's leadership improve equity?

City's leadership should get involved more with their communities.

Theodore Gray

Did not respond.

Jen Sarduy

www.SarduyforDistrict2.com

Age: 33

Occupation: Communications Manager at National Harm Reduction Coalition

Education: HS + continuing education in care work, communications and reproductive justice

What's the best way for voters to reach you? Email: SarduyForDistrict2@gmail.com

Have you run for elected office before? (Please list previous offices sought)

No

Please list highlights of your civic involvement (for example, service on boards/commissions or leadership positions held):

— Co-founder of Re+Birth Equity Alliance: free health screenings; community events; Mobile Mental Health Clinic; and Systemic Racism + Implicit Bias training. — Worked with Tarrant County Birth Equity Collaborative, The Link Up, UNT HSC, TCPHD, and others to offer free community programming.— Served on Diamond Hill Jarvis Neighborhood Association as the former secretary and remains a member, and she served on the Trail Driver's Park Advisory Committee Fort Worth Public Art Selection Panel.

Have you ever been arrested, charged with a crime or otherwise been part of a criminal proceeding? If yes, please explain:

No

Have you been involved in a civil lawsuit or bankruptcy proceeding? If yes, please explain:

No

Who are your top three campaign contributors?

Rachel Gollay, Barbara Clark and Annebel Roberson

Why are you seeking this office?

I'm running for City Council in District 2 because I am deeply connected to this community and because I believe in our ability to thrive when we have equitable access to resources. We need to resist gentrification, reimagine public safety, prioritize housing for all, and center the community's ideas and participation in city planning.

What are the biggest challenges facing your city/district?

— Increased policing and partnerships with ICE (287g)— Deprioritization, no people-first policies— Infrastructure and over-zoning (environmental racism, trains, potholes, lots of accidents)

What would your top 3 policy priorities be?

Housing over harassment: We can end homelessness in Fort Worth. We have the resources to house everyone in Fort Worth. Homelessness is not an issue of scarcity — it's about priorities. We need to prioritize housing-first policies and increasing affordability in the city, not wasting precious community resources to punish people for poverty. Growth over gentrification: We can invest in our communities without displacement. District 2 and the city of Fort Worth are both growing rapidly and we need elected representatives who understand who rapid growth affects the people who already live in our communities. Justice over jails: We can transform public safety in Fort Worth. Across the country and the world, communities are discovering new ways of resolving conflict, addressing violence, and healing harm. We can reimagine public safety in our community by reducing what we spend on policing, jails and criminal justice and investing in solutions that get to the root of violence and harm.

Why should voters choose you over your opponent(s)?

The current council voted unanimously 98.45% of the time from 2015-2021, and a motion only failed 1.66% of the time. That means a motion doesn't even come up for a vote unless our entire body of 9 council members (including the Mayor) are in lock-step. We need transformation we can feel in this city and it will take bold leadership to get us there. We need representatives who are willing and ready to bring the community to every table where decisions are being made.

COVID-19 has radically changed our country and city. What would have done differently than current leaders to navigate the pandemic?

I would have prioritized the needs of the people in the city by halting all evictions, requiring hazard pay for essential workers, creating easy access to aid for workers affected by lost or reduced wages, and providing more accessible testing and screening. I would NOT have rented out huge city spaces to big groups for profit or denied mask science like what we saw happen through the pandemic to date. Our city leaders chose to be behind the latest advice at every step of the way. We need to explore what kind of support the community still needs. We know COVID-19 is not over and we will continue to see health and economic impact for years to come. When we know our goals and priorities are to keep the people of Fort Worth safe, we can prepare to respond to crises — from COVID to the recent winter storm — in the ways people need.

Though Fort Worth is one of the fastest growing cities in the country, a 2018 economic development study noted we risk becoming a bedroom community to Dallas County, where job growth is strong. What should the city do to attract jobs, corporate relocations and other economic development?

I'm not overly concerned with comparisons to Dallas. Fort Worth is a city with almost 1 million residents and our city continues to experience rapid growth. We need to allow our communities to grow without gentrifying them. We need to allow the people of Fort Worth to build the communities they want and need by hiring local developers and including the community in planning. We need to prioritize the needs of people in Fort Worth, and I don't believe offering tax incentives for corporate relocations is the way we get to that kind of future. I know we can support job growth by supporting small businesses, better wages, and the kind of values in new development and revitalization that our community needs.

Last year the Star-Telegram highlighted disparities in the 76104 ZIP code that led to the area having the worst life expectancy in Texas. The investigation revealed a lack of access to jobs, transportation, groceries and health care. What should the city do to improve circumstances in the area?

Nationwide research shows that race-based disparities lead to disparate health outcomes. What we're seeing when we look at the 76104 zip code is overall inequality and the community needs more access to food, care, resources, housing, and support. Rather than the city dropping in the resources they think that community needs, I think the city should downzone that area and look at what resources are set up to thrive there. We need to fund what the people of 76104 are already doing for each other like the Southside Community Garden.

The city's budget will take a hit from COVID-19 in the coming years, particularly in the form of lost sales and tourism revenue. What priorities would be in your city budget?

Our city's budget is a moral document and it controls who has access to resources. Because of the pandemic, the people of Fort Worth are ready to take a look at what actually makes us safe. We are realizing that when we prioritize our budget mostly on surveillance and punishment, that doesn't make us feel safe from crises like COVID-19, the winter storm, or everyday crises like poverty, food insecurity, housing insecurity, racism, ableism, sexism, etc. Right now, Fort Worth spends almost the entire city's public safety budget and the majority of the General Fund on policing and fire response. By spending nearly $1 million per day on policing, we have made a $350 million hammer, but not everything is a "nail." We need more tools and solutions to address public safety, public health, and other crises that we can create together with participatory budgeting.

Fort Worth's property taxes are out of balance, with the vast majority of revenue coming from homeowners rather than commercial property taxes. How would you correct this?

Fort Worth uses city resources to control the most vulnerable to structural inequities among us and that shows up in our top-down approach to taxation and enforcement. I think a lot about the ways that trash ordinances are enforced in working class communities versus the enforcement of maintenance of commercial parking lots or other spaces. We cannot expect working class and poor people who are already cost-burdened by low wages and rising housing costs in the city to bear the cost burden of funding priorities they have no way to influence. Meanwhile, developers and businesses have many more opportunities to be heard by city leaders, have much more influence over the city's budget and ordinances, and they aren't sharing their part of those costs.

Fort Worth's public transportation lags behind other major cities in Texas both in the scope of the system and the amount of public money spent on transit. Trinity Metro is in the process of redesigning the bus network and has requested additional funding from the city. Do you support boosting the city's allocation to Trinity Metro? How should Fort Worth improve its public transportation?

Fort Worth's public transportation is really challenging to use. The bus system is difficult, the train only takes you out of the city, we need inter-city transportation that is free, well-maintained, and supports the movement of working-class and poor folks in Fort Worth. Investing in public transportation can reduce travel and vehicle ownership costs for residents in the community, reduce traffic congestion, and increase employment when more residents gain access to transit to/from work opportunities.

A chief complaint from residents in Fort Worth's suburban neighborhoods are congested arterial streets. Often new subdivisions outpace street capacities. What can be done to improved this?

Fort Worth needs more sustainable plans for growth and community involvement in changes across the city. We are on a 20-year plan for upgrading critical infrastructure, which means at the rate of growth Fort Worth is seeing, we'll always be behind the curve on having the kind of resources we need to grow sustainably. We need alternative traffic patterns, public transportation, and community involvement in neighborhood transformation so our neighborhoods never outgrow systems we rely on to get by.

The current City Council accepted the Race and Culture Task Force recommendation for a civilian review board for the police department, but the board has not been established. What form do you think this review board should take?

I was one of the many people who pushed the city toward a civilian review board in support of the Tarrant County Coalition for Community Oversight (TCCCO) following the murder of Atatiana Jefferson by FWPD officer Aaron Dean. We need rotating community members with nominations made by the public for the review board. We can have more participation and regular voting on committee members with the help of the Neighborhood Services department. We have infrastructure set up with the city water bills, community canvassers in Neighborhood Services, and liaisons between neighborhood groups and city leadership. We need to find ways to use technology and regular communication to engage the people of Fort Worth in decisions that affect all of us. The Fort Worth Police Officer Association (POA) has contributed hundreds of thousands of dollars to sitting and upcoming campaigns for Council and it is a conflict of interest for City leaders, who resisted the civilian review board, and they must not also be able to undermine it by nominating and selecting its committee members. The Council governs too many police procedures and policies and too many members have taken too many pennies from the POA to be considered impartial.

There has been an ongoing cry to improve equity in Fort Worth, including a campaign last year to end the special police sales tax and devote that money to transportation or social services. Are there changes you'd like to see to the police department?

Yes. Our state has the largest prison population of any state in the jailingest country on Earth. If Texas were a country, it would have the highest incarceration rate in the world. Fort Worth spends nearly $1 million per day on policing, but the safest communities don't have more police, they have more resources. The transformation we need goes so far beyond reforms like training, tools, and policies. We must invest in alternatives to policing that make our communities safer and stronger and we can't do that if we're putting most of our resources toward policing. We need our youth in our communities, not in jails. We need our families together, not separated. We deserve access to conflict resolution resources that don't involve handcuffs, guns, deportation, or state-sanctioned violence. We need investment in well-lit streets, well-marked roads, housing for all, access to mental health care, green spaces, affordable and nutritious food, and expanded recreation center and library hours to contribute to the reduction of violence in our community without tying those improvements to more surveillance and policing. We keep us safe and it's time the city invested in the ways we know how to create safety together.

As Fort Worth grows and diversifies, how should the city's leadership improve equity?

"Nothing about us without us is for us." Inclusion can't be an afterthought. City Hall has a responsibility to protect the resources it takes to organize effectively with our neighbors and participate in local governance. Collaboration is more than just letting people know what has been decided already. City leadership should not be inventing solutions no one asked for behind closed doors. We don't have to wait to create the space it takes to include the people of Fort Worth at every stage of city planning. Prioritizing our self-determination, community needs, and collective health should take precedence over a process that is easy and fast. We must prioritize the needs of people most affected by the inequality and include them in planning solutions and distributing city resources. A City Council that actively listens, combined with a Fort Worth that feels reflected in the chamber gives us the potential to create and embrace solutions that really work for us.

Juan Sixtos

https://www.Sixtos4FW.com/

Age: 32

Occupation: Engineer

Education: Associate of Arts (attained) — Bachelor of Science (in progress)

What's the best way for voters to reach you? My website

Have you run for elected office before? (Please list previous offices sought)

No.

Please list highlights of your civic involvement (for example, service on boards/commissions or leadership positions held):

I currently serve as the Vice President of the Marine Creek Hills Neighborhood Association, and the Crime Watch Captain for my neighborhood.

Have you ever been arrested, charged with a crime or otherwise been part of a criminal proceeding? If yes, please explain:

No, other than minor traffic violations.

Have you been involved in a civil lawsuit or bankruptcy proceeding? If yes, please explain:

No.

Who are your top three campaign contributors?

Michael Franklin, Glenda Bishop, Ronald Morel

Why are you seeking this office?

Fort Worth is in dire need of new grassroots leaders that will foster an economy encouraging small businesses to create new jobs, improve the quality of our classrooms, establish proper funding for our emergency responders and safeguard them from wrongful persecution, and assure City Hall operates with integrity, competence, and remains customer-centric toward all residents. I am running for Fort Worth City Council to ensure that our city flourishes.

What are the biggest challenges facing your city/district?

District 2 and the city as a whole, is in desperate need of decreasing response time from first responders as well as increased community involvement to further reduce crime rates and house fires in the district. In addition, there has not been enough investment in roadway infrastructure, which has led to congestion problems and increased delays. By developing a sustainable road policy, this will reduce costs to residents. There is a need for a liaison between community groups and code compliance for more direct communication to address areas of concern within the district. The master plan for the remaining undeveloped property in the district needs to be redesigned for best utilization. The councilmember for District 2 should be an ambassador for constituents and ensure their concerns are addressed. I would devote my time as a city councilmember focusing on these much-needed areas for the district.

What would your top 3 policy priorities be?

Public Safety — We need to increase funding to our public safety operations to develop proper and up-to-date training tactics, invest in new tools and non-lethal weapons for police — while still carrying a firearm for when necessary, and a system of de-escalation for inadvertent errors. We need to safeguard our emergency responders.Infrastructure — Our current investments in our roadway infrastructure have led to congestionproblems and increased delays. We need to develop a sustainable road and transit policy with new modes of transportation that will reduce costs to residents. In addition, we need to upgrade and improve our water system to prevent another "great freeze" from occurring in the future.Development — We need a healthy mix of affordable neighborhoods, apartments, buildings,parking lots, sidewalks, and trees. The master plan for the undeveloped property in the district needs to be re-designed for best utilization.

Why should voters choose you over your opponent(s)?

I am a young aspiring leader in the community, and I am running a grassroots campaign completely on my own, with absolutely no special interests. I am not in this race for any type of political fame. I have personally taken the time to get with residents in the district to understand their concerns for the city, because I truly care for Fort Worth. I am the only candidate with an extensive platform posted publicly on my website for complete transparency for prospective voters.

COVID-19 has radically changed our country and city. What would have done differently than current leaders to navigate the pandemic?

I would not have closed or limited the occupancy of any business, especially small businesses, as this is what caused so many of them to go out of business. I also would not have closed the court systems either as they are a required resource in our society. Finally, I would not have mandated the use of masks, instead I would have highly encouraged citizens to follow CDC guidelines.

Though Fort Worth is one of the fastest growing cities in the country, a 2018 economic development study noted we risk becoming a bedroom community to Dallas County, where job growth is strong. What should the city do to attract jobs, corporate relocations and other economic development?

The city should provide cuts in regulation, tax breaks, and other incentives for job-creating businesses to relocate to Fort Worth.

Last year the Star-Telegram highlighted disparities in the 76104 ZIP code that led to the area having the worst life expectancy in Texas. The investigation revealed a lack of access to jobs, transportation, groceries and health care. What should the city do to improve circumstances in the area?

The city should ensure that there is appropriate zoning for businesses within 76104 (including grocery store chains, and health care), and invest in adequate public transportation services for 76104. Thus creating jobs within 76104 and providing access to jobs through public transportation. The city overall should provide cuts in regulation, tax breaks, and other incentives for job-creating businesses to relocate to Fort Worth.

The city's budget will take a hit from COVID-19 in the coming years, particularly in the form of lost sales and tourism revenue. What priorities would be in your city budget?

Public safety, infrastructure, and development would be my top priorities for the city as a whole.

Fort Worth's property taxes are out of balance, with the vast majority of revenue coming from homeowners rather than commercial property taxes. How would you correct this?

This would need to be carefully studied. While I am a proponent to reducing property taxes for residents, we also cannot drive away our businesses. There are alternative tax solutions that we could consider such as a consumption tax.

Fort Worth's public transportation lags behind other major cities in Texas both in the scope of the system and the amount of public money spent on transit. Trinity Metro is in the process of redesigning the bus network and has requested additional funding from the city. Do you support boosting the city's allocation to Trinity Metro? How should Fort Worth improve its public transportation?

We need to ensure that we continue efforts to reduce property taxes for residents. I believe further studies would need to be done to determine the appropriate funding for our public transportation.

A chief complaint from residents in Fort Worth's suburban neighborhoods are congested arterial streets. Often new subdivisions outpace street capacities. What can be done to improved this?

We need to develop a better sustainable road policy to ensure current roads are being maintained, in addition to building new roadways ahead of the placement of new subdivisions.

The current City Council accepted the Race and Culture Task Force recommendation for a civilian review board for the police department, but the board has not been established. What form do you think this review board should take?

I do not believe the civilian review board is necessary, as civilians are not qualified to understand the aspects of police work. Instead I believe the Internal Affairs unit of the department should be held under higher scrutiny to ensure good officer conduct. In order for this to happen, the police department would need supplementary funding to ensure the Internal Affairs unit is adequately trained for reviewing officer conduct.

There has been an ongoing cry to improve equity in Fort Worth, including a campaign last year to end the special police sales tax and devote that money to transportation or social services. Are there changes you'd like to see to the police department?

I believe we need to increase funding to our public safety operations to develop proper and up-to-date training tactics, invest in new tools and non-lethal weapons for police — while still enabling them to carry a firearm for when necessary, and a system of de-escalation for inadvertent errors.

As Fort Worth grows and diversifies, how should the city's leadership improve equity?

I believe the city's leadership should partner with state agencies, local organizations and nonprofits to help provide resources for housing, services, and job opportunities for those that are in need of the resources, thus improving equity.

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