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Memphis and Mississippi take their fight over water rights to the Supreme Court

The Tennessean (Nashville) logo The Tennessean (Nashville) 10/15/2021 David Plazas, Nashville Tennessean
Middle Claiborne Aquifer area of interest in Mississippi vs Tennessee Supreme Court case. (source: U.S. Geological Survey) © Commercial Appeal Middle Claiborne Aquifer area of interest in Mississippi vs Tennessee Supreme Court case. (source: U.S. Geological Survey)

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen:

This is David Plazas, pinch hitting for newsletter curator LeBron Hill, who is on a well-deserved vacation.

Today's edition features the latest column by journalist Tonyaa Weathersbee, our colleague at The Memphis Commercial Appeal, who wrote about the rift between Tennessee and Mississippi over water rights. 

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The conflict specifically involves Mississippi claiming that Memphis should not be allowed to use water in an aquifer even though it sits right underneath Bluff City. This fight has made it all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court for its 2021-22 session.

Weathersbee researched the legal history of this and other natural resources tugs-of-war across the nation, and she contends the evidence shows Mississippi is going to lose in court.

She suggests the two parties come up with a way to start a truce that is in the best interest of the public as whole.

Scroll to read the column.

Here's what else you'll find in this week's newsletter:

  • Rev. Vincent L. Windrow of Murfreesboro shared his sermon about seeking justice for Black children wrongly arrested and overpoliced in Rutherford County.
  • USA TODAY reporters Thaddeus L. Johnson and Natasha N. Johnson write about how even though media reports focus disproportionately on white victims of crime, Black men are more likely to be victimized than other groups.
  • Vickie Quarles, a Tennessee-based member of Covid Survivors for Change and Young Widows and Widowers of COVID-19, writes a moving essay on how children who lost parents to the coronavirus need more support in school.
  • Knoxville News Sentinel columnist Robert Booker writes about how his city honored civil rights icon Booker T. Washington back in the day.

LeBron will be back next week for another edition of Black Tennessee Voices. Thank you for your readership.

If you like this newsletter, consider subscribing to the Tennessee Voices newsletter, showcasing featured opinion and commentary of the week, and the Latino Voices newsletter, telling stories for and with the Latinx community across the state.

Have an excellent weekend!

David Plazas is the opinion and engagement director for the USA TODAY Network Tennessee and host of the Tennessee Voices podcast. Feel free to reach out at dplazas@tennessean.com, call me at (615) 259-8063 or tweet to him at @davidplazas.

This article originally appeared on Nashville Tennessean: Memphis and Mississippi take their fight over water rights to the Supreme Court

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