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Ohio lottery scratch-off shortage over as warehouse shutdown because of coronavirus opens

Dayton Daily News logo Dayton Daily News 6/23/2020 Bonnie Meibers - Staff Writer
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An Ohio lottery warehouse was temporarily shutdown because someone at the facility tested positive for the coronavirus.

The Scientific Games facility in Solon, Ohio, which distributes scratch-off games to retailers across the state, was temporarily closed after a positive coronavirus case. The facility reopened last week.

“The health and safety of our employees and retail partners continues to be our highest priority,” said Danielle Frizzi-Babb, spokeswoman for the Ohio Lottery Commission.

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Some local stores felt the shutdown of the warehouse.

B Jay’s in Vandalia and Bee-Gee’s Minite Market in Kettering said they were running low on lottery tickets, but got shipments in this week.

Bee-Gee’s Minite Market is the top cashier of Mega Millions prizes and top-selling Mega Millions retailer in its region, according to Ohio Lottery. Bee Gee’s Minit Market in Kettering sold its first $1 million ticket in the historic Mega Millions drawing in 2018.

In the last fiscal year, Bee Gee’s reportedly sold $21,350 in Mega Millions prizes and $220,010 in tickets.

Arrow Wine and Spirits in Centerville said the store ran low or ran out of a couple popular items, like scratch-offs, said General Manager Jason Bush.

Typically, Bush said the Ohio Lottery will call the store weekly to see if the store would like to order more lottery tickets. A couple of weeks ago, Bush said he got a message saying that delivery would likely be disrupted because of the coronavirus.

“We had a couple of weeks where they didn’t call us, but we didn’t run too low, so I didn’t really call them either,” Bush said.

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This week, Arrow Wine and Spirits got a new shipment of lottery tickets, Bush said.

“They seem to be getting their legs back up under them,” he said.

Services supporting the Ohio Lottery moved to a secondary Scientific Games facility while that warehouse was closed so that retailers and players would still have access, Frizzi-Babb said.

The Solon facility opened after a professional, deep sanitation. The facility is also taking other additional health and safety measures in accordance with state and Centers for Disease Control guidelines, she said.

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