You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Since the Pandemic Began, 1 in 500 Americans Have Died of COVID-19

U.S. News & World Report logo U.S. News & World Report 9/15/2021 Kaia Hubbard
a man standing in front of a window: GRANTS PASS, OR - SEPTEMBER 09: (EDITOR'S NOTE: EDITORIAL USE ONLY.) Medical staff in the COVID-19 Intensive Care Unit at Three Rivers Asante Medical Center treat a patient on September 9, 2021 in Grants Pass, Oregon. Like many hospitals in the state, Three Rivers Asante is facing their largest COVID-19 surge since the beginning of the pandemic, forcing them to operate well above capacity. (Photo by Nathan Howard/Getty Images) © (Nathan Howard/Getty Images) GRANTS PASS, OR - SEPTEMBER 09: (EDITOR'S NOTE: EDITORIAL USE ONLY.) Medical staff in the COVID-19 Intensive Care Unit at Three Rivers Asante Medical Center treat a patient on September 9, 2021 in Grants Pass, Oregon. Like many hospitals in the state, Three Rivers Asante is facing their largest COVID-19 surge since the beginning of the pandemic, forcing them to operate well above capacity. (Photo by Nathan Howard/Getty Images)

The U.S has reached another milestone in the 19 months since the country saw its first coronavirus case – 1 in every 500 Americans have died of COVID-19.

The death toll came to just under 664,000 on Tuesday night, according to Johns Hopkins University data. That's 0.2% of the nation's 331.4 million population, based on CDC figures, or 1 in every 500 Americans.

The grim milestone comes as the delta variant has crippled hospitals, filling up beds throughout a handful of states in the country, while vaccine hesitancy persists. Meanwhile, coronavirus cases have increased in children, coinciding with the start of the school year, as local, state and federal leaders have clashed on how to return to school safely.


Video: Pandemic stats: US has one COVID death for every 500 residents, cases surge in children (USA TODAY)

UP NEXT
UP NEXT

The Biden administration, along with health experts have continuously said that the majority of coronavirus deaths remain among the unvaccinated. Last week, President Joe Biden changed his tone on vaccinations from request to demand for some workers throughout the country, and urged governors to require vaccinations for all teachers to protect ineligible young children in schools.

But the global coronavirus picture is perhaps looking up, as the World Health Organization reported the first substantial decline in weekly coronavirus cases on Tuesday in more than two months, and all regions reported declines in cases as compared to the previous week.

Copyright 2021 U.S. News & World Report

AdChoices
AdChoices

More from U.S. News & World Report

U.S. News & World Report
U.S. News & World Report
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon