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The original Woodstock, by the numbers

Stacker Logo By Zack Abrams of Stacker | Slide 1 of 21: Three days. Thirty-two acts. Five hundred thousand people…and 600 porta-potties. The 1969 festival known as Woodstock took place from Aug. 15–18 in Bethel, N.Y., and would’ve been the biggest disaster in music festival history, if not for the fabled musical performances and the harmonious spirit of the attendees. Rain delays messed with the schedule and muddied the festival grounds; it was nearly impossible to find friends if you split up; there were two deaths and numerous arrests for hard drugs, and a tractor crushed one fan. Despite these setbacks, some of the most legendary artists in rock history gave performances that have since been immortalized in the pop-culture imagination. 

Woodstock 1999, the festival planned for the 30th anniversary of the original, literally went down in flames, and Woodstock 2019, the festival planned for the 50th anniversary, is imploding before our eyes. We might never get another music festival like the original Woodstock. The original had its issues, too: The festival was banned from its first location, Wallkill, N.Y., after local residents rejected them. They were also rejected from the town of Saugerties and barely got the permits from Bethel in time to set up the necessary structures. With large gaps in fencing, the organizers were forced to make the festival free as hundreds of thousands of fans descended on the festival grounds, kicking off a muddy, dirty, overcrowded, unsanitary, legendary three-day spectacle. 

In honor of the original Woodstock, which took place 50 years ago, Stacker has rounded up 20 facts and figures that sum up the original three days of peace and music. From the number of babies allegedly born during the festival to the amount artists were compensated, this is our inside look at the greatest music event of the century. Put on that Joni Mitchell song we know and love, and read on. 

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The original Woodstock, by the numbers

Three days. Thirty-two acts. Five hundred thousand people…and 600 porta-potties. The 1969 festival known as Woodstock took place from Aug. 15–18 in Bethel, N.Y., and would’ve been the biggest disaster in music festival history, if not for the fabled musical performances and the harmonious spirit of the attendees. Rain delays messed with the schedule and muddied the festival grounds; it was nearly impossible to find friends if you split up; there were two deaths and numerous arrests for hard drugs, and a tractor crushed one fan. Despite these setbacks, some of the most legendary artists in rock history gave performances that have since been immortalized in the pop-culture imagination. 

Woodstock 1999, the festival planned for the 30th anniversary of the original, literally went down in flames, and Woodstock 2019, the festival planned for the 50th anniversary, has been canceled. We might never get another music festival like the original Woodstock. The original had its issues, too: The festival was banned from its first location, Wallkill, N.Y., after local residents rejected them. They were also rejected from the town of Saugerties and barely got the permits from Bethel in time to set up the necessary structures. With large gaps in fencing, the organizers were forced to make the festival free as hundreds of thousands of fans descended on the festival grounds, kicking off a muddy, dirty, overcrowded, unsanitary, legendary three-day spectacle. 

In honor of the original Woodstock, which took place 50 years ago, Stacker has rounded up 20 facts and figures that sum up the original three days of peace and music. From the number of babies allegedly born during the festival to the amount artists were compensated, this is our inside look at the greatest music event of the century. Put on that Joni Mitchell song we know and love, and read on. 

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