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What Tucker Carlson Said About Derek Chauvin Verdict

Newsweek logo Newsweek 4/21/2021 Darragh Roche
Tucker Carlson wearing a suit and tie looking at the camera: Fox News host Tucker Carlson discusses 'Populism and the Right' during the National Review Institute's Ideas Summit at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel March 29, 2019 in Washington, DC. Carlson devoted his opening commentary on Tuesday to the Derek Chauvin's guilty verdict. © Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images Fox News host Tucker Carlson discusses 'Populism and the Right' during the National Review Institute's Ideas Summit at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel March 29, 2019 in Washington, DC. Carlson devoted his opening commentary on Tuesday to the Derek Chauvin's guilty verdict.

Fox News' Tucker Carlson discussed the conviction of Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin on Tuesday and argued about the potential "consequences of an acquittal."

The jury found Chauvin guilty unanimously on all three counts in a case that had national attention. He was convicted of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter for killing George Floyd and could face up to 75 years in prison.

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Carlson discussed the decision in the opening commentary of his prime time show and indicated that debate would continue about Chauvin's actions and whether his punishment would be fair. A sentencing hearing is scheduled to take place in eight weeks.

"The jury in the Derek Chauvin trial came to a unanimous and unequivocal verdict this afternoon: 'Please don't hurt us,'" Carlson said.

"The jurors spoke for many in this country. Everyone understood perfectly well the consequences of an acquittal in this case.

"After nearly a year of burning, looting, and murder by BLM, that was never in doubt. Last night, 2,000 miles from Minneapolis, police in Los Angeles preemptively blocked roads. Why? They knew what would happen if Derek Chauvin got off.

"In the end, he didn't get off," Carlson said. "If given the maximum sentence under the law, he will spend the rest of his life in prison. Is that a fair punishment? Is the officer guilty of the specific crimes for which he was just convicted?

"We can debate all that, and over this hour we will. But here's what we can't debate: no mob has the right to destroy our cities. Not under any circumstances, not for any reason. No politician or media figure has the right to intimidate a jury, and no political party has the right to impose a different standard of justice on its own supporters."

"Those things are unacceptable in America, but all of them are happening now. If they continue to happen, decent, productive people will leave," Carlson went on. "The country as we knew it will be over. So we must stop this current insanity. It's an attack on civilization."

"At stake is far more than the future of Derek Chauvin or the memory of George Floyd. At stake is America. So before we consider the details of today's verdict, a bigger question, one we should all think about: Can we trust the way this decision was made?

"That's the promise of our justice system—that it's impartial, that it's as fair as human beings can make it. That the cop who killed Ashli Babbitt will be held to the very same scrutiny as the cop who was just convicted of killing George Floyd. That political or ethnic considerations will play absolutely no role in jury deliberations. That justice will be blind."

"Can we say all of that in this case? And if we can't, why can't we?" Carlson concluded.

Newsweek has asked Fox News for comment on this article.

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