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California Becomes 5th State To Legalize Human Composting

California Becomes , 5th State To Legalize , Human Composting. NBC reports that the state of California is getting ready to offer a new option for being laid to rest. Earlier in September, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed a new bill into law creating a program to allow “natural organic reduction” by 2027. . Earlier in September, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed a new bill into law creating a program to allow “natural organic reduction” by 2027. . The bill made California the fifth state to permit what providers call "terramation" or "human composting.". The process, which takes about two months, places a human body in a steel vessel surrounded by wood chips, destined to become fertilizer for new life. The process, which takes about two months, places a human body in a steel vessel surrounded by wood chips, destined to become fertilizer for new life. Human composting creates about 1-2 cubic yards of compost which can then be used in gardens or conservation projects. Proponents of terramation say the environmental benefits make a compelling case for forgoing a traditional casket funeral or cremation. State Rep. Cristina Garcia, the California Democrat who sponsored the legislation, says the bill reflects her desire to return to the Earth when she dies. I’ve always wanted to be a tree. The idea of having my family sitting under my shade one day — that brings a lot of joy, Cristina Garcia, California State Representative, via NBC. In 2019, Washington became the first U.S. state to legalize human composting. Climate change, the state of the planet, the grief we feel about it, is making people more conscious of their end of life, their impact on the planet, Katrina Spade, Recompose founder and CEO, via NBC. Human composting can be the next cremation. If we can really be the default, it would make a tremendous impact, Katrina Spade, Recompose founder and CEO, via NBC
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