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Check out these photos of the massive floating gas terminals that could help to solve Europe's energy crisis

By gglover@insider.com (George Glover) of Markets Insider | Slide 1 of 10:  Europe is hoping that a troop of floating gas terminals will help to solve its energy crisis. The specialist vessels reheat superchilled liquid fuel, converting it into gas that can be pumped onshore. At least 25 are headed to Europe as countries try to replace the pipeline gas choked off by Russia. Several European countries are turning to high-tech floating vessels in a bid to reduce their reliance on Russian energy.Moscow has fueled an energy crisis in Europe by cutting off key pipeline gas supplies, but the specialist ships will enable countries like Germany to import seaborne natural gas for the first time.At least 25 floating storage and regasification units (FSRUs) are headed to Europe, according to S&P Global. Moored offshore, the FSRUs store and then reheat liquefied natural gas before pumping it onshore. That allows countries on the continent to import energy by sea from major exporters like the US, Qatar, and Australia.Here are some photos showing the FSRUs and floating terminals Europe hopes will help meet its winter energy needs and replace the missing Russian gas:

Check out these photos of the massive floating gas terminals that could help to solve Europe's energy crisis

  • Europe is hoping that a troop of floating gas terminals will help to solve its energy crisis.
  • The specialist vessels reheat superchilled liquid fuel, converting it into gas that can be pumped onshore.
  • At least 25 are headed to Europe as countries try to replace the pipeline gas choked off by Russia.

Several European countries are turning to high-tech floating vessels in a bid to reduce their reliance on Russian energy.

Moscow has fueled an energy crisis in Europe by cutting off key pipeline gas supplies, but the specialist ships will enable countries like Germany to import seaborne natural gas for the first time.

At least 25 floating storage and regasification units (FSRUs) are headed to Europe, according to S&P Global. 

Moored offshore, the FSRUs store and then reheat liquefied natural gas before pumping it onshore. That allows countries on the continent to import energy by sea from major exporters like the US, Qatar, and Australia.

Here are some photos showing the FSRUs and floating terminals Europe hopes will help meet its winter energy needs and replace the missing Russian gas:

© Siese Veenstra/ANP/AFP via Getty Images
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