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Hunter Biden says psychedelic toad venom kept him sober for a year

Washington Examiner logo Washington Examiner 4/6/2021 Rob Crilly
Joe Biden, Hunter Biden are posing for a picture © Provided by Washington Examiner

President Joe Biden’s son Hunter tried everything to wean himself off alcohol and crack — from yoga and therapy to psychoactive drugs and the anesthetic ketamine.

But in his new memoir, he credits the secretions of the Sonoran Desert toad with keeping him sober for a year.

He describes how he traveled to Mexico in 2014, as his marriage was unraveling, in a desperate attempt to get his life back in order, using drug treatments that were not legal in the United States.

First, he was given ibogaine, a psychedelic derived from plants at a clinic in Tijuana, which he says created a flickering “slideshow” of his life.

HUNTER BIDEN SAYS HIS NAME WAS LIKE 'GOLD' TO BURISMA

Then, at a beach house, a nurse administered 5-MeO-DMT therapy using toad secretions, which are believed by its fans to ease depression, heal the scars of trauma, and cure addiction.

“It was a profound experience. It connected me in a vividly renewed way to everyone in my life, living or dead. Any division between me my Dad, my mommy, Caspy, or Beau vanished, or at least became irrelevant,” Biden writes in his book Beautiful Things, using a family nickname for his sister Naomi who died with his mother in 1972 after a car crash.

“It felt as though I was seeing all of existence at once – and as one,” he writes.

People who have used the drug compare its effects with that of a religious experience, leaving them feeling reborn.

Former world champion boxer Mike Tyson is among its fans. “It takes you to a place that takes you to another dimension,” he said on his podcast in 2019. “Ever since I did it, I’ve had a miraculous change about me.”

a man wearing a suit and tie: Hunter Biden, the son of President Joe Biden, left, carries his son Beau Biden as he speaks with President Biden before boarding Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., Friday, March 26, 2021. The Bidens are spending the weekend at their home in Delaware. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky) Patrick Semansky/AP © Provided by Washington Examiner Hunter Biden, the son of President Joe Biden, left, carries his son Beau Biden as he speaks with President Biden before boarding Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., Friday, March 26, 2021. The Bidens are spending the weekend at their home in Delaware. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky) Patrick Semansky/AP

But it comes with warnings. Researchers say it can trigger extreme emotional reactions and vomiting.

In the U.S., it is classified as a Schedule 1 controlled substance, carrying the threat of a 10-year prison sentence for possession.

Biden says the experience kept him clean for a year.

“I know it sounds loopy,” he writes. “Yet whatever else it did or didn’t do, the experience unlocked feelings and hurts I’d buried deep for too long. It served as a salve. ... I stayed sober for a year afterward.”

He broke down again after the subsequent death of his brother Beau, storming out of a couple’s therapy session with his then-wife Kathleen when she said she could not forgive him for what he had put their family through.

His memoir was published on Tuesday, and Biden, 51, has been engaged in a media blitz to promote his book.

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In it, he recounts a childhood growing up as the son of a senator, the death of his mother and sister, his battles with addiction, and his relationship with his dead brother’s widow. However, reviews say it largely glosses over the corporate and lobbying work that has made him a political target amid questions from conservatives about the way he has used his family name.

Tags: News, Joe Biden, White House, Hunter Biden, Drugs, Experimental Drugs, Mexico, Books

Original Author: Rob Crilly

Original Location: Hunter Biden says psychedelic toad venom kept him sober for a year

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