You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

NATO commits to Ukraine membership, support against Russia: 'Keep calm and give tanks'

FOX News logo FOX News 11/29/2022 Peter Aitken
UP NEXT
UP NEXT

NATO on Tuesday reaffirmed its commitment to admit Ukraine as a member of the alliance as Russia steps up its attacks in the country. 

Representatives from NATO member states met in Romania to drum up support for Ukraine after devastating missile strikes left the country without power in some areas. Some nations committed military aid to help Kyiv maintain its defense, but most importantly the member states vowed to keep Ukraine on track to join the alliance. 

NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said "NATO’s door is open" and stressed that "Russia does not have a veto" on countries joining the alliance. 

"We stand by that, too, on membership for Ukraine," he said, adding that Russia will see Finland and Sweden as NATO members soon. 

US CONSIDERS SUPPLYING UKRAINE, EASTERN EUROPEAN ALLIES WITH NEARLY 100-MILE STRIKE WEAPONS

A joint statement from the foreign ministers of Estonia, Finland, Iceland, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway, Sweden and Ukraine stressed the "commitment and unwavering support to Ukraine’s European integration" as well as its "Euro-Atlantic aspirations." 

Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, center, participates in a media conference with Finland's Foreign Minister Pekka Haavisto and Sweden's Foreign Minister Ann Linde at NATO headquarters in Brussels on Jan. 24. AP/Olivier Matthys © AP/Olivier Matthys Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, center, participates in a media conference with Finland's Foreign Minister Pekka Haavisto and Sweden's Foreign Minister Ann Linde at NATO headquarters in Brussels on Jan. 24. AP/Olivier Matthys

READ ON THE FOX NEWS APP

"A strong, independent and prosperous Ukraine is essential for the future of European security," the ministers wrote, adding that "the sacrifice of the Ukrainian people for their European choice is unprecedented."

RUSSIA ATTACKS CIVILIAN TARGETS IN UKRAINE AS WINTER SETS IN

In addition to support for expanding the Black Sea Grain Initiative and the New Grain from Ukraine programs – which aim to help avoid widespread famine after Russia tried to strong arm the world by holding 30% of the global grain supply hostage – the ministers urged support for businesses investing in Ukraine and "continuing the current trade liberalization" in the country. 

A woman with a dog waits for a bus in a street without electricity after critical civil infrastructure was hit by Russian missiles, in Kyiv, Ukraine Nov. 23, 2022. Reuters/Valentyn Ogirenko/File Photo © Reuters/Valentyn Ogirenko/File Photo A woman with a dog waits for a bus in a street without electricity after critical civil infrastructure was hit by Russian missiles, in Kyiv, Ukraine Nov. 23, 2022. Reuters/Valentyn Ogirenko/File Photo

"This is part of our collective responsibility to make sure that justice, human rights and international law prevail," the minister concluded. "We will continue our close collaboration in ensuring strong political financial and military support to Ukraine for as long as it takes."

REPORTER'S NOTEBOOK: LEAVING UKRAINE AFTER THE ‘BEST AND WORST OF TIMES’

Lithuania’s Foreign Minister Gabrielius Landsbergis tweeted out that his message to fellow NATO foreign ministers is "Keep calm and give tanks." 

Rescuers work near houses heavily damaged by a Russian missile strike in Dnipro, Ukraine Nov. 26, 2022. Reuters/Mykola Synelnykov © Reuters/Mykola Synelnykov Rescuers work near houses heavily damaged by a Russian missile strike in Dnipro, Ukraine Nov. 26, 2022. Reuters/Mykola Synelnykov

Some officials and analysts believe that Ukraine’s relationship with NATO – and its potential to join the alliance – played a role in prompting Russia’s invasion as Putin feared having another NATO ally along his country’s border. 

But Ukraine will not join NATO in the near future as its borders remain contested with Russia. 

Stoltenberg, despite his commitment to support Ukraine’s application should it seek membership, worried that trying to push ahead with membership now could end up dividing what has so far remained a staunchly unified alliance. 

"We are in the midst of a war, and therefore we should do nothing that can undermine the unity of allies to provide military, humanitarian, financial support to Ukraine because we must prevent President Putin from winning," he said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

AdChoices
AdChoices

More From FOX News

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon