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Russia's first floating nuclear power plant, which activists dubbed 'Chernobyl on ice,' has docked near Alaska. Photos show its journey.

Business Insider Logo By Aria Bendix of Business Insider | Slide 1 of 14: 
  Russia's first floating nuclear plant, a vessel called
  Akademik Lomonosov, 
    arrived at its final destination on September 14.
  
  After about a decade of construction, the plant traveled
  3,100 miles across the Arctic Ocean to a remote area in northern
  Russia. 
  
  It will soon provide enough electricity for around 100,000
  homes. 
  
  Environmentalists have 
    criticized the concept of nuclear plants at sea, arguing
    that they could be difficult for emergency-response teams to
    reach if an accident were to occur.
  
  
    Visit
    Business Insider's homepage for more.
  

  As the Akademik Lomonosov sailed across the Arctic Ocean toward a
  remote region of Russia earlier this month, its freshly-painted
  exterior bore the signature red, white, and blue colors of the
  nation's flag. 

  The vessel is Russia's first floating nuclear power plant,
  complete with two loaded nuclear reactors. It reached the port of
  Pevek, an Arctic town across from Alaska, on September 14. From
  there, it will start generating enough electricity for an
  estimated 100,000 homes.

  The plant could spur other nations to acquire floating nuclear
  power plants of their own, but environmentalists 
  worry about the safety of such facilities. Under extreme
  circumstances, some activists have said, an environmental
  disaster such as a tsunami could trigger a nuclear explosion at
  sea.

  Nuclear experts at the environmental nonprofit Greenpeace have
  dubbed the floating plant "Chernobyl on ice," a reference to the
  1986 nuclear disaster that led to 
  widespread contamination across Europe.

  Take a look at how the floating nuclear power plant came to life.

As the Akademik Lomonosov sailed across the Arctic Ocean toward a remote region of Russia earlier this month, its freshly-painted exterior bore the signature red, white, and blue colors of the nation's flag.

The vessel is Russia's first floating nuclear power plant, complete with two loaded nuclear reactors. It reached the port of Pevek, an Arctic town across from Alaska, on September 14. From there, it will start generating enough electricity for an estimated 100,000 homes.

The plant could spur other nations to acquire floating nuclear power plants of their own, but environmentalists worry about the safety of such facilities. Under extreme circumstances, some activists have said, an environmental disaster such as a tsunami could trigger a nuclear explosion at sea.

Nuclear experts at the environmental nonprofit Greenpeace have dubbed the floating plant "Chernobyl on ice," a reference to the 1986 nuclear disaster that led to widespread contamination across Europe.

Take a look at how the floating nuclear power plant came to life.

© Alexander Ryumin/TASS/Getty Images

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