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Brett Favre supports legislation to end youth tackle football

Packers Wire logo Packers Wire 6/21/2018 Zach Kruse

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Former Green Bay Packers quarterback Brett Favre doesn't want his 8-year-old grandson playing tackle football, and he doesn't want any other young kids risking their future playing a dangerous game at such a young age.

Favre, who started an NFL-record 321 straight games, dived into his crusade against youth tackle football in an interview with the U.K.'s Daily Mail.

He said he's in favor of state and federal laws banning tackle football for developing children. One such law, which bans tackling for kids under the age of 12, is already in the works in Illinois.

"The state level is a start, but we have to adopt this plan and all do it together," Favre said. "The body, the brain, the skull is not developed in your teens and single digits. I cringe. I see these little kids get tackled, and the helmet is bigger than everything else on the kid combined. They look like they're going to break in half."

Favre believes parents are already beginning to push their kids away from football, especially at early ages. He's also promoting a prescription drug that could help stop or prevent CTE, the degenerative brain disease that has been linked to head injuries in football and other sports.

Repetitive brain injury can have lasting and lethal consequences, even for fully developed adults. The damage is even more pronounced for children with developing brains.

Favre called head injuries in football a "serious issue" that "needs to be dealt with."

The former Packers quarterback estimates he suffered countless concussions during his 20-year playing career, which came to an end with a severe head injury finally during the 2010 season. In recent years, Favre has admitted to playing through multiple concussions and dealing with post-retirement memory issues as a result.

As a Pro Football Hall of Famer and an ironman of the sport, Favre could be exactly the kind of prominent figure required to gain momentum for the movement.

"I think it's going to take someone who has poured his blood, sweat and tears into it," Favre said.

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