You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

The best San Antonio architecture in 2019

mySA logo mySA 11/20/2019 By Richard A. Marini, Staff writer
a blue sky: The Pout House, Shackelford County: Committee on the Environment Award for Excellence in Sustainability and a Citation Award
Architects Overland Partners used a data-driven design process to fine tune the home’s orientation toward the sun, its natural ventilation and its energy performance. The construction is simple and the materials are appropriate to the home’s location in West Texas. © Provided by Hearst Newspapers

The Pout House, Shackelford County: Committee on the Environment Award for Excellence in Sustainability and a Citation Award

Architects Overland Partners used a data-driven design process to fine tune the home’s orientation toward the sun, its natural ventilation and its energy performance. The construction is simple and the materials are appropriate to the home’s location in West Texas.

An East Side performing arts center, a greenbelt near Brooks, a home in Santa Fe and Trinity University’s Laurie Auditorium were a few of the buildings recognized for awards by the San Antonio chapter of the American Institute of Architects during a ceremony Tuesday evening at the McNay Art Museum.

a large crowd of people: Laurie Auditorium, Trinity University: 25-Year Distinguished Building Award 
Designed by Ford, Powell and Carson and Bartlett Cocke Architects, the 30,000-square-foot auditorium was one of the largest theaters in San Antonio upon its completion in 1969. The auditorium is noted for its widely splayed Greek theater plan, in which all patrons are seated on a single, dished floor with a balcony. The award recognizes projects of significant cultural importance that were completed at least 25 years ago and have withstood the test of time. © Provided by Hearst Newspapers

Laurie Auditorium, Trinity University: 25-Year Distinguished Building Award

Designed by Ford, Powell and Carson and Bartlett Cocke Architects, the 30,000-square-foot auditorium was one of the largest theaters in San Antonio upon its completion in 1969. The auditorium is noted for its widely splayed Greek theater plan, in which all patrons are seated on a single, dished floor with a balcony. The award recognizes projects of significant cultural importance that were completed at least 25 years ago and have withstood the test of time.

The 2019 AIA San Antonio Design Awards also were the first in the country to more highly rate projects with a sense of environmental sustainability through a new application form.

a view of a grassy hill: Greenline Park: Community Impact Award 
Designed by Beaty Palmer Architects, the 42-acre park transformed underutilized flood land and drainage channels into a much-needed green space that links Brooks to the San Antonio River. The award recognizes publicly funded projects that promote social equity. © Provided by Hearst Newspapers

Greenline Park: Community Impact Award

Designed by Beaty Palmer Architects, the 42-acre park transformed underutilized flood land and drainage channels into a much-needed green space that links Brooks to the San Antonio River. The award recognizes publicly funded projects that promote social equity.

“We now have other chapters ready to follow in (AIA San Antonio’s) footsteps,” said Anne Schopf, design partner with Mahlum Architects in Seattle and a member of the AIA’s National Committee on the Environment Advisory Group.

an empty parking lot in front of a building: The East Central High School Performing Arts Center: Mayor’s Choice Award
Selected by Mayor Ron Nirenberg, this arts center houses a 1,000-seat auditorium surrounded by several theatrical design rooms with glazed windows so people walking around the building can catch glimpses of students working on their next production. The Mayor’s Choice Award recognizes outstanding work on a publicly funded architectural project in Bexar County. © Provided by Hearst Newspapers

The East Central High School Performing Arts Center: Mayor’s Choice Award

Selected by Mayor Ron Nirenberg, this arts center houses a 1,000-seat auditorium surrounded by several theatrical design rooms with glazed windows so people walking around the building can catch glimpses of students working on their next production. The Mayor’s Choice Award recognizes outstanding work on a publicly funded architectural project in Bexar County.

In addition to recognizing buildings and other developments, the event also recognized the contributions of several individuals, including Stephen R. Souter of Marmon Mok Architecture, who was given the Legacy Award for a lifetime of distinguished leadership and dedication to architecture.

a house with bushes in front of a building: Vibrant Restaurant, Houston: Citation Award
Built at the site of a former '60s-era dry cleaner, the Lake | Flato Architects design takes smart advantage of the existing building’s original elements to create an atmosphere casual and comfortable but not overdone. © Provided by Hearst Newspapers

Vibrant Restaurant, Houston: Citation Award

Built at the site of a former '60s-era dry cleaner, the Lake | Flato Architects design takes smart advantage of the existing building’s original elements to create an atmosphere casual and comfortable but not overdone.

Click through the slideshow above to see photos of the winning architecture projects.

a group of people sitting at a train station: The Big Bend Fossil Discovery Center, Big Bend National Park: Merit Award
The Lake | Flato Architects project is an off-grid, open-air education center with a butterfly roof that recalls the winged Quetzalcoatlus hanging from above. Building materials were selected to blend with the surrounding terrain and also to be durable and low maintenance. © Provided by Hearst Newspapers

The Big Bend Fossil Discovery Center, Big Bend National Park: Merit Award

The Lake | Flato Architects project is an off-grid, open-air education center with a butterfly roof that recalls the winged Quetzalcoatlus hanging from above. Building materials were selected to blend with the surrounding terrain and also to be durable and low maintenance.

Richard A. Marini is a features writer in the San Antonio and Bexar County area. Read him on our free site, mySA.com, and on our subscriber site, ExpressNews.com. | rmarini@express-news.net | Twitter: @RichardMarini

a large brick building with green grass: Washington County Ranch, Santa Fe: Merit Award
A Lake | Flato Architects project, this ranch home was designed with minimal heated and air-conditioned spaces, promoting a connection to the outdoors and surrounding landscape. A solar array on the carport roof offsets most of the home’s energy use. © Provided by Hearst Newspapers

Washington County Ranch, Santa Fe: Merit Award

A Lake | Flato Architects project, this ranch home was designed with minimal heated and air-conditioned spaces, promoting a connection to the outdoors and surrounding landscape. A solar array on the carport roof offsets most of the home’s energy use.

a large long train on a dining room table: Epoch Estate Wines Tasting Room, Templeton, California: Merit Award
The project, by Lake | Flato Architects, was built on the site of the original 130-year-old York Mountain Winery, which was condemned following the San Simeon earthquake in 2003. The new tasting room is a full reconstruction using salvaged materials from the original building. © Provided by Hearst Newspapers

Epoch Estate Wines Tasting Room, Templeton, California: Merit Award

The project, by Lake | Flato Architects, was built on the site of the original 130-year-old York Mountain Winery, which was condemned following the San Simeon earthquake in 2003. The new tasting room is a full reconstruction using salvaged materials from the original building.

AdChoices
AdChoices

More from San Antonio Express-News

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon