You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Long Beach City Council weighs options for Queen Mary's future

KNX 1070 News Radio Los Angeles logo KNX 1070 News Radio Los Angeles 5 days ago Daniella De Robbio
Saige Ryan Campbell et al. taking a selfie: Joseph Levi and Saige Ryan attend the Queen Mary's Dark Harbor Media & VIP Preview Event on September 28, 2017 in Long Beach, California. © Provided by KNX 1070 News Radio Los Angeles Joseph Levi and Saige Ryan attend the Queen Mary's Dark Harbor Media & VIP Preview Event on September 28, 2017 in Long Beach, California.

Long Beach officials continue to ask what's next for the Queen Mary.

The boat has been a tourist attraction since docking in 1967. It closed in the beginning of the pandemic and the city took control after the boat’s recent operator filed for bankruptcy in January.

At a Tuesday meeting of the Long Beach City Council, officials weighed multiple options. The Times reported the ship could be preserved for 25 years for somewhere between $150 million and $175 million. Preservation for the next 100 years would cost between $200 million and $500 million and would require bringing it to a dry dock. Finally, the council considered sinking or dismantling the ship for up to $190 million.

Saige Ryan Campbell et al. taking a selfie © Provided by KNX 1070 News Radio Los Angeles

“If you dismantle it in the existing birth, you are probably looking between $120 to $140 million,” City Manager Tom Modica said during the meeting.

“You may be able to save some if you transport it to a foreign scrap facility or you could also do artificial reefing of it.”

Many councilmembers remarked during the meeting that the ship hasn't been a burden on the taxpayers and has instead created $3.3 million in tax revenues annually from its operation as a hotel, a venue, and as a film location, according to the LA Times.

“I think most cities would die for an opportunity to have a ship like the Queen Mary,” said Councilmember Cindy Allen, according to the Los Angeles Daily News, “that brings 1.6 million annual visitors — that’s an incredible number — and $94 million in economic impact.”

AdChoices
AdChoices

More from KNX 1070 News Radio Los Angeles

KNX 1070 News Radio Los Angeles
KNX 1070 News Radio Los Angeles
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon