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Inside Tailwind’s seaplane that will fly between New York and Boston

The Points Guy logo The Points Guy 7/28/2021 Benji Stawski
a group of people on a boat in the water © Provided by The Points Guy
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Editor’s note: Tailwind Air provided a complimentary and very brief media flight to TPG to check out the new service. The opinions expressed below are entirely from the author and weren’t subject to review by Tailwind or any external entity.

In less than a week, regularly scheduled seaplane service between New York and Boston will officially become a reality.

The hotly anticipated flights will be operated by Tailwind Air, a small scheduled shuttle and charter operation based in New York. Ahead of the launch, Tailwind invited TPG and other members of the media to get a look inside the aircraft that will be used for the new route.

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a sign above a body of water: (Photo by Benji Stawski/The Points Guy) © The Points Guy (Photo by Benji Stawski/The Points Guy)

Tailwind will fly the same planes it uses for its other shuttle routes: the Cessna 208 Caravan turboprop. The average age of Tailwind’s seaplane fleet is young, less than 5 years old. The one we toured was just 2 years old.

a small boat in a body of water: (Photo by Benji Stawski/The Points Guy) © The Points Guy (Photo by Benji Stawski/The Points Guy)

You board the aircraft via a ladder affixed to the floats. While it may seem challenging, Tailwind’s pilots told me that they are able to accommodate mobility-impaired passengers.

There is a total of eight seats onboard, spread across four rows in a 1-1 configuration. Seating is typically a free-for-all, unless the pilots determine that the plane’s weight needs to be distributed differently.

The seats are made of comfy leather and offer 35 inches of legroom. While that’s more akin to a standard extra-legroom economy seat than a first-class one, they seemed perfectly comfortable for a 75-minute hop between Boston and New York.

Related: I just booked Tailwind’s seaplane flight between Boston and New York. Will the much-awaited service finally launch?

That said, the seats in the front row seemed a bit tighter than the rest.

a bag of luggage: (Photo by Benji Stawski/The Points Guy) © The Points Guy (Photo by Benji Stawski/The Points Guy)

However, regardless of where you sit, you’re guaranteed stellar window views.

That’s important because the windows are the only form of entertainment available onboard. There’s a reading light and air nozzle above every seat but there are no power outlets or USB ports. There’s also no in-flight Wi-Fi and cellular service is spotty at the altitudes these planes fly.

AvGeeks will appreciate that the cockpit is open. Every Tailwind flight is operated by two pilots.

a boat sitting on top of a car: (Photo by Benji Stawski/The Points Guy) © The Points Guy (Photo by Benji Stawski/The Points Guy)

At the rear of the aircraft is a storage area for baggage. Every passenger is allowed to bring a standard-sized airline carry-on, weighing up to 20 pounds. Note that there’s no bathroom onboard.

a boat sitting on top of a bed: (Photo by Benji Stawski/The Points Guy) © The Points Guy (Photo by Benji Stawski/The Points Guy)

Tailwind’s service between New York and Boston is set to launch on Aug. 3. Flights start at $395 each way and go up to as much as $795, though discounted commuter packs are available. TPG will be on one of the first flights so stay tuned for a full review of the experience!

a body of water with a city in the background: (Photo by Benji Stawski/The Points Guy) © The Points Guy (Photo by Benji Stawski/The Points Guy)  

Featured photo by Benji Stawski/The Points Guy.

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Editorial Disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.


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