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A historic 11th-century castle that survived the French Revolution is selling for the first time in 1,000 years. Take a look inside.

INSIDER Logo By insider@insider.com (Debanjali Bose) of INSIDER | Slide 1 of 9:  A castle in France called the Château de Verteuil is on the market with a $3.3 million asking price, per the Paris-based real-estate agency Patrice Besse.  The castle dates back to the 11th century and survived both the Hundred Years' War and the French Revolution. Home to the same French noble family for about a millennium, the Château de Verteuil sits on nearly 100 acres of land and has 14 bedrooms, multiple chapels, lounges, and a library that can fit 1,000 books. At one time, the castle housed the "Unicorn Tapestries," a celebrated piece of medieval artwork currently displayed at the Met Cloisters in Manhattan. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. A literal castle is on the market in France, and it can be yours for a mere $3.3 million.The massive property once belonged to the Rochefoucauld family, according to luxury real-estate agency Patrice Besse, which holds the listing. The Rochefoucaulds are among the oldest and most famous families of the French nobility.The property, a protected historic monument, "has been in the same family for 1,000 years, and it is like a work of art that has never been on the market," Patrice Besse, the founding president of the real-estate agency of the same name, told The New York Times. Despite being first built roughly 1,000 years ago and extensively damaged in the Hundred Years' War and during the French Revolution, the home is in excellent condition, having undergone several restorations and renovations over the centuries. It's even been outfitted with a few modern conveniences, including new windows and central heating in some parts of the castle, per the listing.The current owners — Sixte de La Rochefoucauld and his wife, Ingrid, who are both in their mid-sixties — told The Times of London that they need to sell the property on the public market due to Sixte's declining health and because "maintaining the building is costing a crazy amount of money." They were unable to find someone else within the surviving branches of the Rochefoucauld family to buy the castle.Take a look inside the historic home.Read the original article on Insider

A historic 11th-century castle that survived the French Revolution is selling for the first time in 1,000 years. Take a look inside.

  • A castle in France called the Château de Verteuil is on the market with a $3.3 million asking price, per the Paris-based real-estate agency Patrice Besse
  • The castle dates back to the 11th century and survived both the Hundred Years' War and the French Revolution.
  • Home to the same French noble family for about a millennium, the Château de Verteuil sits on nearly 100 acres of land and has 14 bedrooms, multiple chapels, lounges, and a library that can fit 1,000 books.
  • At one time, the castle housed the "Unicorn Tapestries," a celebrated piece of medieval artwork currently displayed at the Met Cloisters in Manhattan.
  • Visit Insider's homepage for more stories.

A literal castle is on the market in France, and it can be yours for a mere $3.3 million.

The massive property once belonged to the Rochefoucauld family, according to luxury real-estate agency Patrice Besse, which holds the listing. The Rochefoucaulds are among the oldest and most famous families of the French nobility.

The property, a protected historic monument, "has been in the same family for 1,000 years, and it is like a work of art that has never been on the market," Patrice Besse, the founding president of the real-estate agency of the same name, told The New York Times

Despite being first built roughly 1,000 years ago and extensively damaged in the Hundred Years' War and during the French Revolution, the home is in excellent condition, having undergone several restorations and renovations over the centuries. It's even been outfitted with a few modern conveniences, including new windows and central heating in some parts of the castle, per the listing.

The current owners — Sixte de La Rochefoucauld and his wife, Ingrid, who are both in their mid-sixties — told The Times of London that they need to sell the property on the public market due to Sixte's declining health and because "maintaining the building is costing a crazy amount of money." They were unable to find someone else within the surviving branches of the Rochefoucauld family to buy the castle.

Take a look inside the historic home.

Read the original article on Insider
© Courtesy of Patrice Besse

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