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Amy Schneider's 'Jeopardy' Reign Has Come to an End

Esquire Logo By Adrienne Westenfeld of Esquire | Slide 2 of 11: Ken Jennings needs no introduction. In 2004, Jennings, then a software engineer in Salt Lake City, threw the Jeopardy! record book out the window with an unprecedented 74-game winning streak, which netted him a whopping $2,520,700. Jennings’ streak captivated the nation, increasing Jeopardy!’s ratings by 22% and making it the highest-ranked syndicated television show. To this day, Jennings holds the records for longest winning streak and highest average of correct responses. His Jeopardy! winnings (including tournament paydays) and other game show appearances have lodged him in the television pantheon as the highest-earning contestant in the history of American game shows. Jennings spent his winnings on what he calls “the three T’s: taxes, tithing, and widescreen TV” (Jennings, a Mormon, practices tithing 10% of his yearly income to the Church of Latter Day Saints). There’s been no truly post-Jeopardy! life for Jennings, a forever friend of the show, who came back to face off against IBM supercomputer Watson, and who remains an occasional host.

1) Ken Jennings

Ken Jennings needs no introduction. In 2004, Jennings, then a software engineer in Salt Lake City, threw the Jeopardy! record book out the window with an unprecedented 74-game winning streak, which netted him a whopping $2,520,700. Jennings’ streak captivated the nation, increasing Jeopardy!’s ratings by 22% and making it the highest-ranked syndicated television show. To this day, Jennings holds the records for longest winning streak and highest average of correct responses. His Jeopardy! winnings (including tournament paydays) and other game show appearances have lodged him in the television pantheon as the highest-earning contestant in the history of American game shows. Jennings spent his winnings on what he calls “the three T’s: taxes, tithing, and widescreen TV” (Jennings, a Mormon, practices tithing 10% of his yearly income to the Church of Latter Day Saints). There’s been no truly post-Jeopardy! life for Jennings, a forever friend of the show, who came back to face off against IBM supercomputer Watson, and who remains an occasional host.

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