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‘Extreme Heat Belt’ Could Be the Norm in U.S. By 2053

‘Extreme Heat Belt’ Could Be the Norm , in U.S. By 2053. ‘Extreme Heat Belt’ Could Be the Norm , in U.S. By 2053. The phenomenon of an "extreme heat belt" was described in a report released on Aug. 15 by the First Street Foundation. According to the report, . ... those who live in an area that stretches from the Great Lakes to TX could experience consistent temperatures of 125 or higher by 2053. ... those who live in an area that stretches from the Great Lakes to TX could experience consistent temperatures of 125 or higher by 2053. The authors of the report say that everyone can be affected by rising temperatures. Everybody is affected by increasing heat, whether it be absolute increases in dangerous days or it’s just a local hot day, Jeremy Porter, First Street Foundation CRO, via NBC News. The study authors say the results of the model they created have been surprising for many. How far north it stretched — I think a lot of people just hearing southern Wisconsin, Chicago and those areas being part of the extreme heat belt is surprising, Jeremy Porter, First Street Foundation CRO, via NBC News. Academics responding to the report say that how these temperatures could affect the nation's agriculture is troubling. If there are hot spots and dry spells in these places, farmers will have to shift their priorities and what types of crops they'll plant, Noboru Nakamura, University of Chicago Geophysical Sciences Professor, via NBC News. ... and that will all have a lot of long-term consequences, Noboru Nakamura, University of Chicago Geophysical Sciences Professor, via NBC News. They also point out that certain areas with high population densities could become difficult places to live. If a certain fraction of days per year are over 100 degrees, then unless you have the resources and infrastructure to stay cool, then it makes certain places very difficult to survive, Noboru Nakamura, University of Chicago Geophysical Sciences Professor, via NBC News. Temperature increases could likely change how and where people choose to put down roots. I can certainly envision that would shake up peoples' decisions about where to live, Noboru Nakamura, University of Chicago Geophysical Sciences Professor, via NBC News
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