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Hurricane Sally Update: Alabama Hit As Category 2 Storm Makes Landfall

Newsweek logo Newsweek 9/16/2020 Kashmira Gander
a man flying through the air while riding a wave in the ocean: Waves break ashore near rthe Gulf State Park pier as the outer bands of Hurricane Sally come ashore on September 15, 2020 in Gulf Shores, Alabama. The storm is bringing heavy rain, high winds and a dangerous storm surge from Louisiana to Florida. © Getty Waves break ashore near rthe Gulf State Park pier as the outer bands of Hurricane Sally come ashore on September 15, 2020 in Gulf Shores, Alabama. The storm is bringing heavy rain, high winds and a dangerous storm surge from Louisiana to Florida.

Hurricane Sally has made landfall in Alabama as a Category 2 hurricane, according to officials.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) said Sally had made landfall near the city of Gulf Shores at 4:45 a.m. CDT. It said maximum sustained winds were at 105 mph.

"Catastrophic and life-threatening" flooding was likely along portions of the north-central Gulf Coast, the NHC said.

In an update published at 4:00 a.m. CDT, the NWS National Hurricane Center in Miami, Florida, said Sally's northern eyewall with hurricane conditions was moving across the Gulf Coast from Pensacola Beach, Florida, westward to Dauphin Island, Alabama.

A hurricane warning was in effect for the Mississippi and Alabama border to the border of Okaloosa and Walton counties in Florida.

A storm surge warning was also in effect for Fort Morgan Alabama to the county line of Walton and Bay, Florida.

The NHC said there was a tropical storm warning for the East of the Okaloosa and Walton county lines in Florida to Indian Pass, Florida, as well as on the Mississippi and Alabama border to the Mouth of the Pearl River.

In the few hours preceding 4:00 a.m. CDT, there had been "little change" to the hurricane's convective structure. Sally was expected to rapidly weaken after its centre moved inland, according to Miami's National Hurricane Center.

Areas along and just inland of the coast from west of Tallahassee, Florida, to Mobile

Bay, Alabama, were hit by "historic and catastrophic flooding," the centre said.

On Wednesday morning, Pensacola Police department urged people to say off roads, as flooded roadways and intersections, along with hazardous debris had "become too numerous to list."

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